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5
Jul
2018

Source: PhysOrg 
Author: Bob Yirka

A pair of researchers at Peking University has found evidence that suggests liquid CO2 could be safely sequestered in deep sea sediments. In their paper posted on the open access site Science Advances, Yihua Teng and Dongxiao Zhang describe a model they built to mimic CO2 injections beneath the ocean floor and what it showed.

Continue reading Model suggests sequestering CO2 in deep sea sediments might be viable option

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11
Jun
2018

Source: Phys Org
Author: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Miles beneath the ocean’s surface in the dark abyss, vast communities of subseafloor microbes at deep-sea hot springs are converting chemicals into energy that allows deep-sea life to survive—and even thrive—in a world without sunlight. Until now, however, measuring the productivity of subseafloor microbe communities—or how fast they oxidize chemicals and the amount of carbon they produce—has been nearly impossible.

Continue reading Fueling a deep-sea ecosystem: Surprisingly productive microbes are a key source of food in the abyss

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20
May
2018

Source: EurekAlert!
Kumamoto University

A new species of microcrustacean (Stygiopontius ) was collected from a submarine hot spring (hydrothermal vent) of a volcanic seamount (Myojin-sho caldera) in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. This crustacean group lives only around deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the central Atlantic or eastern Pacific Oceans. The new species is the first of its kind discovered in Japanese waters. Reina Senokuchi, a Kumamoto University student, was the first to make the discovery saying, “When I realized that it might be a new species, I was both delighted and very surprised. I couldn’t believe it was true.”

Continue reading Japanese student discovers new crustacean species in deep sea hydrothermal vent

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