General

13
Nov
2019

Source: SciTechDaily

A collaboration between researchers at the University of Hawai‘i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), Hawai‘i Pacific University (HPU) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) revealed for the first time growth rates of deep-sea coral communities and the pattern of colonization by various species.

Continue reading Growth Rates of Deep-Sea Coral Communities Revealed for the First Time

Share this article:
18
Oct
2019

Source: Phys.org
Author: Kim Fulton-Bennett

In the dark depths of the ocean, pretty much the only sources of light are the animals that live there. Whether flashing, glimmering, or emitting glowing liquids, many deep-sea animals are able to produce light (bioluminesce). MBARI researchers recently found that animals that live on the seafloor are much less likely to produce light than those swimming or drifting in the “midwater.”

Continue reading Glowing to the bottom

Share this article:
17
Oct
2019

Source: Mashable
Author: Mark Kaufman

Dean Grubbs thinks great white sharks are boring.

The veteran shark scientist, who has researched different shark species for 30 years, is vastly more intrigued by the little-seen dominant predator of the deep, dark, tropical and temperate oceans: the sixgill shark (most sharks have five gills).

Continue reading Most dominant shark of the deep sea tagged at depth for the first time

Share this article:
17
Oct
2019

Source: CNN

A team of researchers stumbled upon a “whale fall,” a carcass of a baleen whale, during a live-streamed deep-sea dive. Incredible video shows a wide variety of sea creatures feasting on it.

Watch the video here.

Share this article:
19
Sep
2019

Source: Phys.org
Author: Krystle Anderson

The deep, cold waters off the rocky coast of Point Sur, California, are home to an unexpected community of organisms that most people associate with tropical settings—corals. Scientist Charlie Boch and his colleagues recently compared different methods to restore deep-sea coral by transplanting live coral fragments and measuring their survival rates. The experiment was conducted on Sur Ridge, 60 kilometers (37 miles) offshore and 800 to 1,300 meters (2,624 to 4,265 feet) below the ocean’s surface.

Continue reading Learning how to restore deep-sea coral communities

Share this article:
9
Sep
2019

Source: Huffington Post
Author: Chris D’Angelo

THE BOTTOM OF THE ATLANTIC OCEAN — Forty miles off the coast of North Carolina, the 274-foot research vessel Atlantis paced a dark, empty swath of ocean in evenly spaced lines as the crew pinged sound waves into the deep. A quarter-mile below, plumes of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, rose from the seafloor.

Continue reading Chasing The Methane Dragon That Lurks In The Deep Sea

Share this article:
9
Sep
2019

Source: Mongabay
Author: Erik Hoffner

Deep sea biologist Diva Amon is a Trinidadian who was raised by the shore of the Caribbean Sea, but has become well known not for the sea’s edge, but rather for what lies deep beneath it. She co-founded SpeSeas, a non-profit NGO focused on increasing marine science, education and advocacy in Trinidad and Tobago, and is currently a Research Fellow at the National History Museum, London.

Continue reading Into the abyss with deep sea biologist Diva Amon

Share this article:
5
Sep
2019

Source: National Geographic
Author: Haley Cohen Gilliland

As the team lowered Nadir, a bulbous three-seat submarine, into the waters off of the Bahamian island of Eleuthera on June 29th, the rain that had pummeled them that afternoon began to wane. They were eager to interpret the improving weather as a good omen; a lot was riding on this dive.

Continue reading Scientists tag deep-sea shark hundreds of feet underwater—a first

Share this article: