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14
Dec
2018

Source: EarthSky
Author: Sandra Brooke

When people think of coral reefs, they typically picture warm, clear waters with brightly colored corals and fishes. But other corals live in deep, dark, cold waters, often far from shore in remote locations. These varieties are just as ecologically important as their shallow water counterparts. They also are just as vulnerable to human activitieslike fishing and energy production.

Continue reading Huge previously-undetected coral reef off US East Coast

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10
Dec
2018

Source: National Geographic
Author: Sarah Gibbens

It felt a lot like a moon landing to the researchers who experienced it—descending thousands of feet below the surface of the ocean into complete darkness. Ambient ocean light extends down only about 600 feet. After that, no amount of straining your eyes will help you see through the inky blackness.

Scientist Tim Shank and photographer Luis Lamar were descending into Lydonia canyon, one of several among the canyons and underwater mountains sitting 130 miles from Massachusetts, when they were slowly surrounded by darkness.

Continue reading Exclusive photos show deep-sea canyon in U.S. waters teeming with life

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3
Dec
2018

Source: The Conversation
Author: Sandra Brooke

When people think of coral reefs, they typically picture warm, clear waters with brightly colored corals and fishes. But other corals live in deep, dark, cold waters, often far from shore in remote locations. These varieties are just as ecologically important as their shallow water counterparts. They also are just as vulnerable to human activities like fishing and energy production.

Continue reading Deepwater corals thrive at the bottom of the ocean, but can’t escape human impacts

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30
Nov
2018

Source: The Conversation
Author: Joanne Burgess and Edward Barbier

In the “The Lorax,” an entrepreneur regrets wiping out all the make-believe truffala trees by chopping them down to maximize his short-term gains. As the Dr. Seuss tale ends, the Once-ler – the man responsible for this environmental tragedy – tells a young child that “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”

Likewise, many corporations that profit from nature’s bounty, such as Unilever, Patagonia and Interfaceappear to be reaching a similar conclusion. They are realizing that it’s time for the business world to do more about conservation.

Continue reading Why companies should help pay for the biodiversity that’s good for their bottom line

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25
Nov
2018

Source: ABC News
Author: Samantha Jonscher

With oil exploration looming on the horizon for the Great Australian Bight, stakeholders felt it was an important time to learn more about the species that call the rough waters off Australia’s southern coastline home.

Continue reading Great Australian Bight survey discovers 400 new marine species, catalogues biodiversity before oil drilling

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19
Nov
2018

Source: National Geographic
Author: Jessica Perelman

“95% of our oceans have never been explored.” This is a statistic that I hear regularly, and it holds a pretty strong message. What’s out there beneath the surface? How is the ocean changing? One of the greatest challenges in conveying the significance of the oceans is effective communication that goes beyond highly technical, hard-to-understand scientific literature. Science and public engagement are not mutually exclusive, and the value of great discoveries can only be realized if this connection is sustained. As humans we are natural story tellers, artists, musicians, inventors, and explorers. This is the toolbox that will foster enthusiasm and educate the global community about why the oceans are worth exploring- and protecting.

Continue reading All Hands on Deck: A (sea)grassroots approach to ocean exploration

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