General

11
Mar
2019

Source: Papua New Guinea Mine Watch

On 21 February 2019, Nautilus Minerals Inc. filed for protection from creditors under the Canadian Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act.  Whilst claiming this as a victory in their decade-long campaign to stop the Nautilus Solwara 1 Project in the Bismarck Sea, local communities and civil society in Papua New Guinea are taking heed that the fight is not over until all Nautilus licences are cancelled.

Continue reading Call for Nautilus seabed mining licences to be cancelled in Papua New Guinea

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10
Mar
2019

Source: Cnet
Author: Mark Serrels

University of Rhode Island shark researcher Bradley Wetherbee discovered a new type of Lantern shark while doing his doctorate in the 1990s, but it’s only in the last few years, almost 30 years later, that he’s been able to give that shark a name. And he named it after his daughter.

Continue reading A strange deep-sea shark gets a name, almost 30 years after discovery

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8
Mar
2019

Source: iPolitics
Author: Holly Lake

The waters off the coast of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula are part of Canada’s newest marine protected area (MPA). Official protection of the area has been a long time coming, with efforts to have the peninsula designated having started in 2011. This week, Fisheries and Oceans Minister Jonathan Wilkinson made it official.

Continue reading ‘Crown jewel’ of the Gulf of St. Lawrence part of new marine protected area

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8
Mar
2019

Source: Radio Canada International
Author: Lynn Desjardins

The Canadian government will create new marine refuges off the western coast that will protect some ancient and fragile glass sponge reefs. The charity, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS), “is very pleased” that this “ecological treasure” not far from Vancouver will be protected from all bottom-contact fishing. CPAWS and other groups have worked hard to study and secure protection of the reefs.

Continue reading Charity applauds glass sponge reef protection

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8
Mar
2019

Source: Deep Sea News
Author: Alex Warneke

California based artist and dabbler in the deep sea, Lily Simonson had me at “Party of Yeti’s.” In a new exhibit at the Harvard Museum of Natural History entitled Lily Simonson: Painting the Deep, Simonson features her large scale interpretations of the denizens of the deep. “Inspired by explorations of deep ocean life made in collaboration with Harvard University Professor Peter Girguis, Simonson’s art reflects a passion for the process of science, deep affection for the natural world, and dedication to seeking out and “bringing to light,” the beauty and mystery of places and lifeforms little known and rarely seen.”

Continue reading here.

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7
Mar
2019

Source: Stuff.co.nz
Author: Charlie Mitchell

Trawlers hunting for fish in the dark, cold depths of the sea may be doing irreversible damage to vast coral reefs on the seafloor.

Findings from New Zealand researchers have some environmentalists pushing for a ban on bottom trawling, the primary method of catching deep sea fish, likening its impact on seabed wildlife to the destruction of kauri forests. 

Continue reading Bottom trawling for fish causing ‘permanent damage’ to deep sea forest

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4
Mar
2019

Source: Nature
Author: Cindy Lee Van Dover

Four decades have passed since vibrant clusters of giant, metre-long tubeworms, discovered at hot springs on the ocean floor by Corliss et al.1, were reported in Science. Until then, the ocean floor was considered to be more like a desert than an oasis.

Corliss and colleagues didn’t discover underwater hot springs by accident; rather, they were trying to discover whether the hypothesis that such sites existed was correct. Theories on the movements of tectonic plates had set the course for this discovery with the idea that the mountain ranges that girdle the globe on the ocean floor, called spreading centres, are volcanic sites at the boundaries of tectonic plates. A key clue to the existence of underwater hot springs was the unexpectedly low conductive heat flux in the ocean’s crust2. Convective heat flow through hot springs could solve the riddle of this missing heat. Warm-water anomalies documented above a spreading centre called Galapagos Ridge guided Corliss et al. to the site at which they discovered underwater hot springs (also called hydrothermal vents).

Continue reading here.

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