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29
Aug
2018

Source: Yale Environment 360

Scientists have discovered a massive deep-sea coral reef stretching at least 85 miles long off the coast of Charleston, South Carolina. The previously unknown reef sits in complete darkness about a half-mile below the ocean surface and is teeming with Lophelia pertusa, a stony coral species, and a variety of other hard and soft corals, several news outlets reported.

Continue reading Scientists Find a Massive Deep Sea Reef Off the U.S. East Coast

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15
Aug
2018

Source: Ecowatch
Author: Center for Biological Diversity

At least 65 California cities and counties have taken action opposing new fossil fuel leasing in the Pacific Ocean since President Trump proposed a massive expansion of drilling in federal waters last year. That ongoing campaign now represents communities with 21.3 million Californians—more than half the state’s population.

Continue reading 65 California Cities, Counties Oppose Trump’s Offshore Drilling Plan

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21
Jul
2018

Source: The Inertia

There are a whole pile of things that go on in the ocean that we don’t know about. Weird fish, strange behaviors, The Bloop, and with any luck, giant sea monsters. That’s why the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research is running Windows to the Deep 2018, an undersea exploration mission that routinely documents some extraordinary stuff.

Continue reading Watch This Incredible Footage of a Lightning-Fast Deep Sea Predator

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20
Jul
2018

Source: MIT Technology Review 

Conamix, a little-known startup based in Ithaca, New York, has raised several million dollars to accelerate its development of cobalt-free materials for lithium-ion batteries, the latest sign that companies are eager to find alternatives to the increasingly rare and expensive metal.

Continue reading A freshly funded battery startup aims to ease the cobalt crunch

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5
Jul
2018

Source: PhysOrg 
Author: Bob Yirka

A pair of researchers at Peking University has found evidence that suggests liquid CO2 could be safely sequestered in deep sea sediments. In their paper posted on the open access site Science Advances, Yihua Teng and Dongxiao Zhang describe a model they built to mimic CO2 injections beneath the ocean floor and what it showed.

Continue reading Model suggests sequestering CO2 in deep sea sediments might be viable option

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