Mining

28
Aug
2020

Source: Expresso
Author: Gonçalo Carvalho

Portugal has much more to gain, economically and not only, if it preserves its marine ecosystems as healthy as possible, because only in this way can they guarantee the sustainability of activities that are characteristic of its identity and that guarantee the livelihood of thousands of Portuguese, such as fishing and tourism. Portugal could have a crucial diplomatic asset in opposition to mining at sea.

Continue reading What Portugal has to gain from being an opponent of deep-sea mining

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10
Aug
2020

Source: University of Hawaii

The deep-sea, ocean depths below 650 feet (200 meters), constitutes more than 90 percent of the biosphere, harbors the most remote and extreme ecosystems on the planet, and supports biodiversity and ecosystem services of global importance. A new publication on the impacts of deep-seabed mining by 13 prominent deep-sea biologists, led by University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Department of Oceanography Professor Craig Smith, seeks to dispel scientific misconceptions that have led to miscalculations of the likely effects of commercial operations to extract minerals from the seabed.

Interest in deep-seabed mining for copper, cobalt, zinc, manganese and other valuable metals has grown substantially in the last decade and mining activities are anticipated to begin soon.

“As a team of deep-sea ecologists, we became alarmed by the misconceptions present in the scientific literature that discuss the potential impacts of seabed mining,” said Smith. “We found underestimates of mining footprints and a poor understanding of the sensitivity and biodiversity of deep-sea ecosystems, and their potential to recover from mining impacts. All the authors felt it was imperative to dispel misconceptions and highlight what is known and unknown about deep-seabed mining impacts.”

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3
Aug
2020

Source: Eos
Author: James Dacey

Advocates of deep-sea mining claim the process is important for providing metals for renewable energy technologies. One of the strongest arguments against offshore mining is that the environmental risks are too high, given that deep-sea ecosystems are among the most undiscovered places on Earth.

A less reported issue is the impact that deep-sea mining would have on developing economies that rely on land-based mining of those same metals. That is the subject of a recent report commissioned by the International Seabed Authority (ISA).

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3
Aug
2020

Source: World Economic Forum
Author: Winnie Yeh

The world is hungry for resources to power the green transition. As we increasingly look to solar, wind, geothermal and move towards decarbonization, consumption of minerals such as cobalt, lithium and copper, which underpin them, is set to grow markedly. One study by the World Bank estimates that to meet this demand, cobalt production will need to grow by 450% from 2018 to 2050, in pursuit of keeping global average temperature rises below 2°C.

Continue reading Deep-sea minerals could meet the demands of battery supply chains – but should they?

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29
Jul
2020

Source: The Scientist
Author: Amanda Heidt

Microbes extracted from deep sea sediments that settled during the age of the dinosaurs have been revived in the lab after eons spent in a dormant state. Despite needing oxygen to survive, the bacteria were able to make do with only trace amounts and almost no food for more than 100 million years. Once reanimated, most of the microbes were able to feed and multiply with seemingly no ill effects attributed to their long period of rest.

Continue reading Scientists Awaken Deep Sea Bacteria After 100 Million Years

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