Mining

9
Sep
2019

Source: Huffington Post
Author: Chris D’Angelo

THE BOTTOM OF THE ATLANTIC OCEAN — Forty miles off the coast of North Carolina, the 274-foot research vessel Atlantis paced a dark, empty swath of ocean in evenly spaced lines as the crew pinged sound waves into the deep. A quarter-mile below, plumes of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, rose from the seafloor.

Continue reading Chasing The Methane Dragon That Lurks In The Deep Sea

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9
Sep
2019

Source: Granada Hoy
Author: Alba Feixas

La viabilidad de la minería submarina de nódulos polimetálicos está siendo estudiada en la Costa Tropical por un grupo de científicos de diferentes ámbitos que se encuentran a bordo del buque oceanográfico Sarmiento de Gamboa, que durante los últimos 10 días se ha dejado ver por diferentes playas del litoral granadino.

Los metales que están siendo estudiados tienen una función crucial en las tecnologías innovadoras de Europa para la fabricación de aleaciones y baterías para automóviles eléctricos, sistemas fotovoltaicos y dispositivos para turbinas eólicas, entre otros productos.

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8
Sep
2019

Source: The Conversation
Author: Anna Metaxas & Verena Tunnicliffe

It is completely dark, just above freezing cold and the pressure is crushing: this is the deep-sea floor. Food is very scarce in this huge region, yet a great diversity of animals have adapted to exploit and recycle resources and thrive within it.

Continue reading Getting to the bottom of things: Can mining the deep sea be sustainable?

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25
Aug
2019

Source: Irish Examiner
Author: Donal Hickey

Over the years, we’ve had controversies about the need to save rare snails which had got in the way of roadworks in places such as Ballyvourney, Co Cork, and the Pollardstown Fen nature reserve in Co Kildare. Some politicians tried to trivialise the issue and mock campaigners, but they missed the point.

Continue reading Progress at a snail’s pace

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10
Aug
2019

Source: Southern Fried Science
Author: Andrew David Thaler

[The following is a transcript from a talk given by Andrew David Thaler at a side event during Part II of the 25th Session of the International Seabed Authority in July, 2019. It has been lightly edited for clarity.]

“I want to change gears this afternoon and talk about a very different kind of mining. For the last two years, Diva and I have been engaged in a data mining project to discover what we can learn and what we still need to learn about biodiversity at hydrothermal vents from the 40-year history of ocean exploration in the deep sea.”

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7
Aug
2019

Source: Mongabay
Author: Shreya Dasgupta

  • Creatures living in deep-sea hydrothermal vents lead a unique life that researchers are only now beginning to understand. Yet these animals are at risk of disappearing because of deep-sea mining before we even learn about them.
  • A deep-sea hydrothermal vent mollusk, the scaly-foot snail (Chrysomallon squamiferum), for example, debuted as endangered on the IUCN Red List this year because of threats from mining.
  • Mongabay spoke with deep-sea biologist Chong Chen, who has been assessing deep-sea hydrothermal vent species for the IUCN Red List, about his work and why listing these species on the IUCN Red List matters.

Continue reading here.

 

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