Science

10
Mar
2019

Source: Cnet
Author: Mark Serrels

University of Rhode Island shark researcher Bradley Wetherbee discovered a new type of Lantern shark while doing his doctorate in the 1990s, but it’s only in the last few years, almost 30 years later, that he’s been able to give that shark a name. And he named it after his daughter.

Continue reading A strange deep-sea shark gets a name, almost 30 years after discovery

Share this article:
4
Mar
2019

Source: Nature
Author: Cindy Lee Van Dover

Four decades have passed since vibrant clusters of giant, metre-long tubeworms, discovered at hot springs on the ocean floor by Corliss et al.1, were reported in Science. Until then, the ocean floor was considered to be more like a desert than an oasis.

Corliss and colleagues didn’t discover underwater hot springs by accident; rather, they were trying to discover whether the hypothesis that such sites existed was correct. Theories on the movements of tectonic plates had set the course for this discovery with the idea that the mountain ranges that girdle the globe on the ocean floor, called spreading centres, are volcanic sites at the boundaries of tectonic plates. A key clue to the existence of underwater hot springs was the unexpectedly low conductive heat flux in the ocean’s crust2. Convective heat flow through hot springs could solve the riddle of this missing heat. Warm-water anomalies documented above a spreading centre called Galapagos Ridge guided Corliss et al. to the site at which they discovered underwater hot springs (also called hydrothermal vents).

Continue reading here.

Share this article:
24
Jan
2019

Source: Sydney Morning Herald
Author: Liam Mannix

Under the Antarctic ice, in the pitch-black depths of the ocean, Australian scientists have discovered animals are evolving into strange and sometimes monstrous new shapes and forms.

Life, these scientists believe, is using the frigid Antarctic waters to experiment, and animals there are evolving at a much faster pace than anywhere else in the world.

Continue reading Down in the deep, beneath the Antarctic ice, a new strange world is rapidly forming

Share this article:
23
Jan
2019

Source: The Guardian

Species as old as the dinosaurs are swimming around in tropical waters at depths accessed by commercial fishermen, according to a world-first study conducted by Australian researchers.

The study, published in the journal Nature on Thursday, examined data on brittle sea stars pulled from 1,500 research voyages in the southern hemisphere from the equator to Antarctica.

Continue reading Brittle star sea ‘dinosaurs’ at risk from commercial fishing, researchers say

Share this article:
18
Jan
2019

Source: Phys.Org

Oxygen—it’s a basic necessity for animal life. But marine biologists recently discovered large schools of fishes living in the dark depths of the Gulf of California where there is virtually no oxygen. Using an underwater robot, the scientists observed these fishes thriving in low-oxygen conditions that would be deadly to most other fish. This discovery could help scientists understand how other marine animals might cope with ongoing changes in the chemistry of the ocean.

Continue reading Biologists discover deep-sea fish living where there is virtually no oxygen

Share this article:
27
Nov
2018

Source: EurekAlert!

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin’s Marine Science Institute have discovered nearly two dozen new types of microbes, many of which use hydrocarbons such as methane and butane as energy sources to survive and grow–meaning the newly identified bacteria might be helping to limit the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and might one day be useful for cleaning up oil spills.

Continue reading Newly discovered deep-sea microbes gobble greenhouse gases and perhaps oil spills, too

Share this article:
25
Nov
2018

Source: ABC News
Author: Samantha Jonscher

With oil exploration looming on the horizon for the Great Australian Bight, stakeholders felt it was an important time to learn more about the species that call the rough waters off Australia’s southern coastline home.

Continue reading Great Australian Bight survey discovers 400 new marine species, catalogues biodiversity before oil drilling

Share this article:
22
Nov
2018

Source: Phys.org
Author: Danica Coto

A rarely seen shark embryo. Corals up to 7 feet (2 meters) high. Sponges with sharp edges.

These were among the hundreds of findings reported by U.S.  who have wrapped up a 22-day mission exploring waters around Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in the deepest dives ever recorded in the region. Guided by other land-based scientists watching live feeds, they collected 89 samples and will now start to analyze them, Daniel Wagner, expedition coordinator with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

Continue reading Scientists wind up deep-water probes in Caribbean waters

Share this article: