Science

5
Jul
2018

Source: PhysOrg 
Author: Bob Yirka

A pair of researchers at Peking University has found evidence that suggests liquid CO2 could be safely sequestered in deep sea sediments. In their paper posted on the open access site Science Advances, Yihua Teng and Dongxiao Zhang describe a model they built to mimic CO2 injections beneath the ocean floor and what it showed.

Continue reading Model suggests sequestering CO2 in deep sea sediments might be viable option

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19
Jun
2018

Source: EurekAlert!
Author: Florida Atlantic University

Drug resistance to antibiotics is on the rise and there is an urgent need to develop new drugs to treat infectious diseases that are a major threat to human health globally. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University’s Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute may have a solution to this problem using sea sponges collected from the ocean depths.

Continue reading Deep-sea marine sponges may hold key to antibiotic drug resistance

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11
Jun
2018

Source: Phys Org
Author: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Miles beneath the ocean’s surface in the dark abyss, vast communities of subseafloor microbes at deep-sea hot springs are converting chemicals into energy that allows deep-sea life to survive—and even thrive—in a world without sunlight. Until now, however, measuring the productivity of subseafloor microbe communities—or how fast they oxidize chemicals and the amount of carbon they produce—has been nearly impossible.

Continue reading Fueling a deep-sea ecosystem: Surprisingly productive microbes are a key source of food in the abyss

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20
May
2018

Source: EurekAlert!
Kumamoto University

A new species of microcrustacean (Stygiopontius ) was collected from a submarine hot spring (hydrothermal vent) of a volcanic seamount (Myojin-sho caldera) in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. This crustacean group lives only around deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the central Atlantic or eastern Pacific Oceans. The new species is the first of its kind discovered in Japanese waters. Reina Senokuchi, a Kumamoto University student, was the first to make the discovery saying, “When I realized that it might be a new species, I was both delighted and very surprised. I couldn’t believe it was true.”

Continue reading Japanese student discovers new crustacean species in deep sea hydrothermal vent

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14
May
2018

Source: National Geographic 
Author: Elaina Zachos

Roughly 50 years ago, the French explorer Jacques Cousteau was sniffing around in the deep ocean with the submarine DEEPSTAR 4000. Built in 1965, the vessel helped to identify life lurking thousands of feet below the ocean’s surface before it was retired in 1972. Among those species was a giant, tentacle-less jellyfish, which eventually came to be known as Deepstaria enigmatica.

Continue reading This Mysterious Deep-Sea Jellyfish Looks Like a Plastic Bag

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13
May
2018

Source: Business Insider
Author: Jeremy Berke

Scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration conducted an expedition to explore uncharted waters in the deepest parts of the Gulf of Mexico— and they found an astonishing “secret garden” of coral thousands of feet below the surface.

Using a remote-operated submersible (ROV), the researchers came across a vibrant, underwater community of bamboo corals over 7,500 feet down.

“This is a truly magnificent garden of coral fans, I don’t think we’ve seen these densities yet in the Gulf of Mexico,” one of the expedition’s scientists said as the ROV revealed the collection of corals.

For a community of corals this dense to exist in the inky darkness thousands of feet below the sea, a lot of factors need to align, according to NOAA.

Continue reading here.

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