Science

17
Mar
2020

Source: The Conversation
Author: Lucy Woodall

Oceans cover over 70% of our “blue” planet and are vital to its health. For instance carbon moves in and out of the ocean and can be stored there for thousands of years. Oceans are also a source of food and livelihood to millions of people, and to the economies of coastal countries. They are also the largest habitable space on the planet and house many different organisms.

But there’s a great deal that scientists still don’t know about the world’s oceans.

Continue reading Why an Indian ocean deep sea mission will help the Maldives and Seychelles manage their oceans

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12
Mar
2020

MEDIA REACTION

The new scientific report from Deep Sea Conservation Coalition (DSCC) member Fauna & Flora International (FFI) sets out evidence that the risk posed by deep-sea mining to biodiversity and vital ocean services is too great to take.

As a result of the report, Sir David Attenborough has called for a moratorium on deep-sea mining.

Continue reading SIR DAVID ATTENBOROUGH CALLS FOR A MORATORIUM ON DEEP-SEA MINING

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20
Feb
2020

Source: CORDIS EU research results 

ATLAS Press release

A new model has projected that current trends in climate change could place over 50% of North Atlantic cold-water coral habitat at risk, while suitable habitats for commercially important deep-sea fish could shift by up to 1000 km northwards. These effects could have far-reaching impacts on the ocean, including significant loss of suitable habitats for deep-sea species, which will in turn affect economies and communities reliant on fish stocks.

Continue reading New Climate Model Projects Major Impacts on Coral and Commercially Important Fish Habitats in the Deep Atlantic due to Climate Change

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29
Jan
2020

Source: Mirror
Author: Michael Havis and Kelly-Ann Mills

A creature so rare that it has only a few recorded sightings across the world has been caught on camera by stunned scientists.

The benthic siphonophore, which looks like a single animal, is actually a “floating city” of many smaller organisms working together.29

Continue reading here.

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23
Jan
2020

Source: The Conversation
Author: Jon Copley

On January 23 1960, Jacques Piccard and Don Walsh climbed into an undersea craft called Trieste and dived nearly 11 kilometres to the deepest point in the ocean – the Challenger Deep of the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean.

Continue reading Race to the bottom of the sea – the little known heroes of the 20th-century’s ‘inner space race’

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12
Dec
2019

Source: Stock Daily Dish

We know a lot about how carbon dioxide (CO2) levels can drive climate change, but how about the way that climate change can cause fluctuations in CO2 levels? New research from an international team of scientists reveals one of the mechanisms by which a colder climate was accompanied by depleted atmospheric CO2 during past ice ages.

Continue reading Deep-sea corals reveal why atmospheric carbon was reduced during colder time periods

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