Science

15
Dec
2017

Source: Marine Conservation Institute 
Author: Kelly Martin

You’ve probably heard the saying that we know less about the deep ocean than we do about the surface of the moon. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, we have explored less than 5% of the ocean to date, so the saying is pretty accurate. However, as technology improves and scientists are able to learn more about the deep, they begin to more clearly understand its ecological value.

Continue reading The Future of the Deep Sea: Undiscovered Wonders at Risk

14
Dec
2017

Source: National Geographic
Author: Sarah Gibbens

Of all Earth’s major ecosystems, the deep sea is one of the least understood—even though it is the largest. But a new comprehensive study that looked at 30 years of video footage from remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROVs) is helping researchers piece together a more accurate map of who is eating whom underwater.

Continue reading Deep-Sea Predators Revealed in 30 Years of Footage

12
Dec
2017

Source: Marine Conservation Institute 
Author: Sam Georgian

Seamounts are underwater mountains rising thousands of feet from the bottom of the ocean. Due to their size and shape, seamounts exert a strong influence on local currents that results in nutrient enrichment and increased food supply. As a result, these massive features are often highly productive ‘oases’ in the deep sea, supporting a large diversity of species including functionally important deep-sea corals (Stocks and Hart 2007). Deep-sea corals provide essential habitat structures for a large number of associated organisms, including many commercially important fish. These communities are currently at risk from a number of threats including climate change, oil and gas extraction, and benthic fisheries.

Continue reading Needle in a haystack: identifying vulnerable marine ecosystems in the deep sea

13
Nov
2017

Source: BioScience, Oxford Academic 
Author: William J. Ripple, Christopher Wolf, Thomas M. Newsome, Mauro Galetti, Mohammed Alamgir, Eileen Crist, Mahmoud I. Mahmoud, William F. Laurance, 15,364 scientist signatories from 184 countries.

Twenty-five years ago, the Union of Concerned Scientists and more than 1700 independent scientists, including the majority of living Nobel laureates in the sciences, penned the 1992 “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity” (see supplemental file S1). These concerned professionals called on humankind to curtail environmental destruction and cautioned that “a great change in our stewardship of the Earth and the life on it is required, if vast human misery is to be avoided.” In their manifesto, they showed that humans were on a collision course with the natural world. They expressed concern about current, impending, or potential damage on planet Earth involving ozone depletion, freshwater availability, marine life depletion, ocean dead zones, forest loss, biodiversity destruction, climate change, and continued human population growth. They proclaimed that fundamental changes were urgently needed to avoid the consequences our present course would bring.

Continue reading World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice