Latest News

3
Jun
2020

Source: Geographical
Author: Sabine Christiansen and Sebastian Unger

You may have heard about minerals on the bottom of the ocean. The UK Government sponsors several exploration contracts for UK Seabed Resources (a subsidiary of the American aerospace and security company Lockheed-Martin) in the Pacific Ocean to look for them. These minerals come from the so-called ‘Area’, the deep seafloor beyond the limits of national jurisdiction and far out in the global ocean.

Continue reading Deep seabed mining could inflict considerable direct and indirect harm

3
Jun
2020

Source: Phys.org

Living in an essentially zero-gravity environment, many deep-sea animals have evolved soft, gelatinous bodies and collect food using elaborate mucus filters. Until now, studying these delicate structures has been virtually impossible. A new study published in the journal Nature describes a unique laser-based system for constructing 3-D models of diaphanous marine animals and the mucus structures they secrete.

Continue reading here.

1
Jun
2020

Source: VOA News

Scientists are urging a temporary halt to deep-sea metal mining. They warn in a report that it could cause severe, damaging effects on Pacific Ocean areas.

The recently-released report examined more than 250 published studies on deep-sea mining. The research was examined by the Deep Sea Mining Campaign – a collection of not-for-profit organizations. Environmental group MiningWatch Canada also cooperated on the study.

Continue reading here.

29
May
2020

Source: My Modern Met
Author: Jessica Stewart

Thanks to the Schmidt Ocean Institute, we’re getting a whole new perspective on life in the deep sea. After exploring the depths of the Indian Sea, they’ve released 4K footage of the Ningaloo Canyons. Located off the western coast of Australia, this previously unvisited area is the location of the institute’s latest expeditions—and the findings are incredible.

The canyons were visited by the ROV Sebastian, an underwater remotely operated vehicle which can go as far as 14,750 feet underwater. This far deeper than any human could ever dive, and the ROV can also stay at that depth far longer than any human-operated vehicle. Thanks to this technology, we’re able to stay on land and see the wonders far below the sea.

Continue reading here.