Latest News

10
Dec
2018

Source: National Geographic
Author: Sarah Gibbens

It felt a lot like a moon landing to the researchers who experienced it—descending thousands of feet below the surface of the ocean into complete darkness. Ambient ocean light extends down only about 600 feet. After that, no amount of straining your eyes will help you see through the inky blackness.

Scientist Tim Shank and photographer Luis Lamar were descending into Lydonia canyon, one of several among the canyons and underwater mountains sitting 130 miles from Massachusetts, when they were slowly surrounded by darkness.

Continue reading Exclusive photos show deep-sea canyon in U.S. waters teeming with life

8
Dec
2018

Source: Quartz
Author: Lynsey Chutel

The rechargeable lithium-ion battery helps define our era. It powers our smartphones and electric cars, and promises a future where we’re better able to store renewable energy. It also requires lithium and cobalt, minerals that some of the world’s poorest countries happen to have in abundance. That should be good news for all concerned, but mismanagement and graft—common in extractive industries—are making the latest mining boom look uncomfortably like the bad old days of previous booms.

Continue reading What really powers your smartphone and electric car

6
Dec
2018

Source: The Economist

After listing on the Toronto stock exchange in 2006 Nautilus Minerals became the public face of a daring new industry: deep-sea mining. It planned to pursue riches on the ocean floor, mining metals such as gold, zinc and copper, desired for lustre, alloys and electronics. Robotic machines (pictured) would cut, grind and gather volcanic rock at a site called Solwara 1, located 1,600 metres beneath the surface of the Bismarck Sea near Papua New Guinea (png). The resultant rocky slurry would be pumped up to a support vessel, then shipped to a site at which the metals could be extracted. Investors were convinced; Nautilus’s shares doubled from their initial price of c$2 ($1.80) in a few months.

Continue reading A high-profile deep-sea mining company is struggling

5
Dec
2018

Source: Sputnik

Mining companies are increasingly coveting the seabed around the world in their thirst for minerals. Sputnik spoke to Duncan Currie, a political and legal adviser to the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition, about attempts to stop mining off the coast of New Zealand.

Last month Sputnik reported on how the International Seabed Authority (ISA) was drawing up new rules on the exploitation of the seabed by deep sea mining companies as booming demand for cobalt, copper, nickel and manganese for the production of electric batteries was encouraging firms to see the ocean as a possible source of these minerals.

Continue reading We Don’t Know the Impact’: Conservationists Fight Attempts to Mine Ocean Floor

5
Dec
2018

Source:Daily Mail
Author: Annie Banerji

In the 1870 Jules Verne classic “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”, underwater explorer Captain Nemo predicted the mining of the ocean floor’s mineral bounty – zinc, iron, silver and gold.

India is catching up with that only now, as it prepares to unearth treasures down below, aiming to boost its economy.

The floor of the world’s seas is scattered with vast beds of black potato-shaped polymetallic nodules comprising copper, nickel, cobalt, manganese, iron and rare earth elements.

Continue reading Race to the bottom? India plans deep dive for seabed minerals

3
Dec
2018

Source: The Conversation
Author: Sandra Brooke

When people think of coral reefs, they typically picture warm, clear waters with brightly colored corals and fishes. But other corals live in deep, dark, cold waters, often far from shore in remote locations. These varieties are just as ecologically important as their shallow water counterparts. They also are just as vulnerable to human activities like fishing and energy production.

Continue reading Deepwater corals thrive at the bottom of the ocean, but can’t escape human impacts

30
Nov
2018

Source: The Conversation
Author: Joanne Burgess and Edward Barbier

In the “The Lorax,” an entrepreneur regrets wiping out all the make-believe truffala trees by chopping them down to maximize his short-term gains. As the Dr. Seuss tale ends, the Once-ler – the man responsible for this environmental tragedy – tells a young child that “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”

Likewise, many corporations that profit from nature’s bounty, such as Unilever, Patagonia and Interfaceappear to be reaching a similar conclusion. They are realizing that it’s time for the business world to do more about conservation.

Continue reading Why companies should help pay for the biodiversity that’s good for their bottom line

27
Nov
2018

Source: EurekAlert!

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin’s Marine Science Institute have discovered nearly two dozen new types of microbes, many of which use hydrocarbons such as methane and butane as energy sources to survive and grow–meaning the newly identified bacteria might be helping to limit the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and might one day be useful for cleaning up oil spills.

Continue reading Newly discovered deep-sea microbes gobble greenhouse gases and perhaps oil spills, too

25
Nov
2018

Source: ABC News
Author: Samantha Jonscher

With oil exploration looming on the horizon for the Great Australian Bight, stakeholders felt it was an important time to learn more about the species that call the rough waters off Australia’s southern coastline home.

Continue reading Great Australian Bight survey discovers 400 new marine species, catalogues biodiversity before oil drilling