Latest News

25
Mar
2019

Source: Deep Sea News
Author: River Dixon

In the beginning, people mused the expansive oceans contained but a handful of organisms.  This idea started with Pliny the Elder, who lived in the first century AD. He wrote that there were only 176 species in the entirety of the ocean.  This was four less than Aristotle had already found, counted, and documented in just the Aegean Sea. Apparently, Pliny wasn’t a big fan of Aristotle’s work. One paper describes this writing of Pliny’s as “gossipy” and I would just like to take a minute to thank the powers that be that none of my scientific writing has yet been described this way.

Continue reading here.

25
Mar
2019

Source: Pew Charitable Trusts

Far from every shore, beyond the jurisdiction of any country, lie the vast high seas, full of life and biodiversity. They cover nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of the world’s ocean and harbor life, ranging from whales, turtles, sharks, and dolphins to deep-sea corals, hydrothermal vents, and, experts believe, a variety of undiscovered sea life.

Today the high seas face increasing threats from human activities, including fishing, pollution, and seabed mining, but there is no comprehensive conservation mechanism in place to protect the biodiversity that thrives in these waters and maintain a healthy ocean.

That could soon change. From March 25 to April 5, governments will reconvene at United Nations headquarters in New York to continue negotiations on the first treaty to protect the high seas by 2020.

Watch the video here.

21
Mar
2019

Source: Amnesty International

Amnesty International is today publicly challenging leaders within the electric vehicle industry to make the world’s first completely ethical battery within five years. At the Nordic Electric Vehicle (EV) Summit in Oslo, the organization is highlighting how lithium-ion batteries, which power electric cars and electronics, are linked to human rights abuses including child labour in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and environmental risks which could undermine their green potential.

Continue reading Amnesty challenges industry leaders to clean up their batteries

15
Mar
2019

Source: The Ecologist
Author: Amber Cobley

If you ask someone to describe the deep sea, the response is often a depressing description of a barren landscape devoid of life; one of such crushing pressure and eternal darkness that the chance of life surviving here seems only possible in stories of science fiction.

So, it would probably surprise you to hear that there are rich, deep-sea ecosystems under threat from an emerging ocean industry… and virtually no-one knows about it.

Continue reading Deep-sea mining: regulating the unknown

15
Mar
2019

Source: Nature
Author: Olive Heffernan

For decades, mining companies have been eager to extract rare and valuable metals and minerals from the deep sea — a practice that scientists have long warned could damage marine ecosystems. Now, the first large-scale test of a major industrial-mining technique promises to provide robust data on the impacts of the controversial practice.

Continue reading Scientists track damage from controversial deep-sea mining method

11
Mar
2019

Source: Papua New Guinea Mine Watch

On 21 February 2019, Nautilus Minerals Inc. filed for protection from creditors under the Canadian Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act.  Whilst claiming this as a victory in their decade-long campaign to stop the Nautilus Solwara 1 Project in the Bismarck Sea, local communities and civil society in Papua New Guinea are taking heed that the fight is not over until all Nautilus licences are cancelled.

Continue reading Call for Nautilus seabed mining licences to be cancelled in Papua New Guinea

8
Mar
2019

Source: iPolitics
Author: Holly Lake

The waters off the coast of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula are part of Canada’s newest marine protected area (MPA). Official protection of the area has been a long time coming, with efforts to have the peninsula designated having started in 2011. This week, Fisheries and Oceans Minister Jonathan Wilkinson made it official.

Continue reading ‘Crown jewel’ of the Gulf of St. Lawrence part of new marine protected area

8
Mar
2019

Source: Radio Canada International
Author: Lynn Desjardins

The Canadian government will create new marine refuges off the western coast that will protect some ancient and fragile glass sponge reefs. The charity, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS), “is very pleased” that this “ecological treasure” not far from Vancouver will be protected from all bottom-contact fishing. CPAWS and other groups have worked hard to study and secure protection of the reefs.

Continue reading Charity applauds glass sponge reef protection