Latest News

29 September, 2020

Source: Stuff.co.nz
Author: Andrea Vance

Vast fishing nets have hauled up 29 species of delicate coral from the still, dark depths of New Zealand’s oceans.

And conservationists are warning that the Government has abandoned protection of the sea bed in favour of expanding bottom trawling.

Continue reading Trawl gear damages fragile coral reefs, so why is the Government sanctioning more hauls?

1 September, 2020

Source: Sciworthy
Author: Andrea Corpolongo

Sunlight does not reach the deepest parts of the ocean, but life still thrives in the darkness. Below depths of 200 meters, where sunlight cannot reach, some organisms eat organic material that falls from the sunlit zone. For these organisms, photosynthetic organisms, such as phytoplankton and algae, form the basis of the food web. Other deep-sea organisms depend on a process called chemosynthesis, which is growth using energy from chemical reactions, rather than from the sun, as in photosynthesis.

Continue reading Deep-sea Mining Impacts on Diverse Ocean Ecosystems

1 September, 2020

Source: Stanford Arts Review
Author: Rishik Kumar

Thanks to evidence found in the deep sea, an ancient mystery regarding the solar system have been solved.

Professor Walner was conducting research at the Australian National University (ANU). His study showed Earth has been traveling for the last 33,000 years through a cloud of faintly radioactive dust.

Continue reading here.

1 September, 2020

Source: Financial Times
Author: Henry Sanderson

Elon Musk’s call for miners to dig more nickel for Tesla’s batteries faces its biggest test in Indonesia, where companies in the world’s top producing nation are planning to dump millions of tonnes of waste into the sea. Mr Musk said on an earnings call last month that Tesla would give a “giant contract” to companies that could mine nickel “efficiently and in an environmentally sensitive way,” in response to a question about the biggest constraint on the electric car maker he runs.

Continue reading here.

28 August, 2020

Source: Expresso
Author: Gonçalo Carvalho

Portugal has much more to gain, economically and not only, if it preserves its marine ecosystems as healthy as possible, because only in this way can they guarantee the sustainability of activities that are characteristic of its identity and that guarantee the livelihood of thousands of Portuguese, such as fishing and tourism. Portugal could have a crucial diplomatic asset in opposition to mining at sea.

Continue reading What Portugal has to gain from being an opponent of deep-sea mining