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23
May
2006

“High seas bottom trawling is just not acceptable. Governments need to feel the pressure. They’re wiping out 8,000 year old coral reefs for the sake of a few fish destined for the rich country markets. It’s just not acceptable.” Kelly Rigg, coordinator of the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition was one of the coalition’s members on Amsterdam’s Museumplein. Surrounded by a giant trawl net and images of deep sea life, she explained some more about the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition (or DSCC) and its work.

Continue reading A deep look into our oceans

19
May
2006

A new publication by the Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) and TRAFFIC confirms the position of the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition (DSCC) that regional fisheries management organisations (RFMOs) are not a panacea to stop the devastation of vulnerable deep-sea marine ecosystems by bottom trawlers operating on the high seas. (1)

Continue reading RFMOs not a panacea

4
May
2006

Deep-water sharks join the ranks of species facing extinction, together with polar bears and the hippopotamus, listed on the World Conservation Union’s 2006 Red List of Threatened Species. The World Conservation Union (IUCN) Red List, released on 2 May 2006 in Switzerland, is the world’s most authoritative inventory of the conservation status of animals and plants.

Continue reading Deep-water sharks, polar bears and hippopotamus face extinction

27
Apr
2006

The Swedish environment minister, Lena Sommestad, has announced that Sweden will push for a European Union position in support of a United Nations moratorium on high seas bottom trawling. After two years of governments promising to take “urgent action” to protect deep sea life, will other countries finally follow suit? “The Swedish government is pushing for a moratorium on bottom trawling on the high seas,” Sommestad said. “We are trying… to convince our EU colleagues that this is an important issue.

Continue reading Can the clocks be stopped?

18
Apr
2006

The Deep Sea Conservation Coalition today posted postcards from the public to the Australian Minister for Environment and Heritage, Senator Ian Campbell. The cards, titled ‘Help save the ancient forests of the deep seas’, described some of the destructive impacts impacts of bottom trawling. The cards asked the Minister to “become a champion for the high seas” by supporting a global moratorium on high seas bottom trawling. Cards were distributed throughout Australia.

Continue reading Public calls for action on high seas bottom trawling destruction

13
Apr
2006

“If all nations that purport to support urgent action to protect the biodiversity of the international waters of the world’s oceans from bottom trawl fishing, were as consistent and persistent as the Republic of Palau, the deep sea habitats of the high seas would undoubtedly already be safe from the fishing practice that continues to ravage the extraordinarily rich, unique and vulnerable biodiversity found in the deep ocean beyond countries’ national waters,” said Deep Sea Conservation Coalition political advisor, Matthew Gianni.

Continue reading High time other countries found Palau’s political backbone

4
Apr
2006

Curtiba, Brazil – Although extinctions are proceeding at an unprecedented rate, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) failed to do more than reiterate the call for immediate action to protect vulnerable deep-sea corals and underwater mountains from high seas bottom trawling, shifting the responsibility to the United Nations. “The decisions on high seas reflect that governments now recognize the grave threats to the unique high seas biodiversity and the need for urgent actions.

Continue reading CBD passes the buck for action on high seas bottom trawling

28
Mar
2006

Last week, from March 20-24, governments met in New York for the preparatory meeting for the Fish Stocks Agreement (FSA) Review Conference to be held from May 22-26. Although Japan, Indonesia and the Philippines indicated their intention to join the FSA, and some improvements were made to the criteria to assess the FSA, process and procedure largely dominated the

Continue reading Process not substance dominates preparatory meeting for FSA review