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6
Jul
2006

The Deep Sea Conservation Coalition today said the decision by Australian fishing company Austral to be part of an industry proposal to close parts of the Southern Indian Ocean from bottom trawl fishing shows they are aware of the need to protect deep-sea life from the destruction caused by bottom trawling, but warned this alone will not solve the problem. “It sounds like a large area but it is a tiny fraction of the South Indian Ocean – maybe as little as 2 per cent” said Lyn Goldsworthy, Australian representative of the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition. “It’s effectiveness in addressing deep sea destruction will depend on significance of the areas involved. It could be areas already fished out. It may cover areas that are unfishable. And it may not cover all the areas under threat – particularly fishable seamounts.

Continue reading Trawl ban a drop in the ocean

5
Jul
2006

Download this press release (pdf) The proposal by New Zealand high seas fishing company Sealord, together with three other fishing companies, to voluntarily refrain from deep-sea fishing in limited areas of the international waters of the Indian Ocean, falls woefully short of the action needed to protect deep-sea corals, seamounts and other unique marine ecosystems in the region.

Continue reading The southern Indian Ocean needs real protection, not voluntary half measures

20
Jun
2006

The Deep Sea Conservation Coalition expressed disappointment that the Australian Government failed to support a Senate motion calling for short-term measures to protect the deep seas from the destructive fishing practice of bottom trawling until longer term arrangements for oceans governance are put in place, in spite of unanimous support from the opposition parties. “This government prides itself as a champion of the oceans, yet it is ignoring the plight of largely untouched and undiscovered vulnerable seamount ecosystems” said Lyn Goldsworthy, Australian representative of the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition. “There appears to be no logical, economic or environmental reason for such stubborn opposition to short term protection measures while longer term regulations are being developed.

Continue reading Australian government fails to protect deep sea ecosystems

19
Jun
2006

The Deep Sea Conservation Coalition today expressed disappointment that the Liberal-National Coalition Government did not support a Senate motion calling for short-term measures to protect the deep seas from the destructive fishing practice of bottom trawling until longer term arrangements for oceans governance are put in place.

Continue reading While Campbell tries to save the whales, Abetz fails to protect deep sea ecosystems

15
Jun
2006

At the United Nations meeting taking place this week in New York to discuss ecosystem approaches and oceans, Palau has presented a new proposal for a moratorium on high seas bottom trawling. In the approach to the meeting, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden and Brazil confirmed their support for a UN moratorium, as science continues to unravel the mysteries and vulnerabilty of deep-sea species and habitats.

Continue reading More evidence, support and a new proposal

31
May
2006

Ottawa – In a meeting with Dr. Sylvia Earle, Canadian Fisheries Minister Loyola Hearn agreed with the renowned ocean explorer’s views on deep sea bottom trawling. “It does damage to the stocks and it does damage to the habitat,” Hearn said. (1) However, Hearn could not say whether Canada will support a moratorium on deep sea bottom trawling in international waters at UN talks in June. He referred to the need to consider companies and people dependent on deep-sea fisheries.

Continue reading Canada’s Fisheries Minister agrees bottom trawling damages habitat and fish stocks