16 April, 2021

The Deep Sea Conservation Coalition’s (DSCC) 2020 Report informs on Fisheries, Deep Seabed Mining and Ocean Governance.

24 March, 2021

Seamounts are fragile and biologically diverse marine ecosystems that are vulnerable to deep-sea fisheries activities and, increasingly, other human impacts.

This briefing examines the current state of seamount science and protection. It summarizes who continues to fish in these unique habitats and presents a case for urgent and intensified political action to protect these biodiversity hotspots.

30 October, 2020

Authors: Susanna Fuller, Duncan Currie, Matthew Gianni, Lyn Goldsworthy, Cassandra Rigby, Kathryn Schleit, Colin Simpfendorfer, Les Watling, Barry Weeber.

16 years have passed since the UNGA first called for States and RFMOs “urgently to adopt … conservation and management measures, in accordance with international law, to address the impact of destructive fishing practices.

This report by the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition (DSCC) reviews the progress made since 2016 and makes recommendations on what more should be done to ensure that both individual high-seas fishing nations and regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs) fully implement the actions called for in UNGA Resolutions 61/105, 64/72, 66/68 and 71/123. It is the latest in a series produced by the DSCC that have been published in advance of the formal reviews conducted by the UNGA.

Although the UNGA review workshop scheduled for August 2020 was postponed due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the information in this report is relevant to RFMO Commission and Scientific Committee meetings taking place over the next 12 months and will help inform the UNGA workshop when it is rescheduled. All documents are available only in English.

3 February, 2020

On February 3, 2020, the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition issued a memo to over 100 Permanent Missions to the United Nations and related organizations in New York. The memo refers to a workshop entitled “To explore the Case for Sourcing Battery Metals from Ocean Nodules and Nori’s Program to Assess Environmental and Social Impacts” scheduled for 5-6 February 2020 in San Diego and organized by speculative deep-sea mining companies DeepGreen and NORI.

In a rush to move this industry forward, proponents such as the workshop organizers have positioned the discussion around the questions of “when and how”, rather than the more fundamental question of “if” deep-sea mining should ever be permitted, and under what circumstances.  Individuals and organizations around the world are increasingly calling for a moratorium on deep-sea mining out of concern for the damage it would cause to the fragile and yet-undiscovered ecosystems and species of the deep, and in the context of the urgent need to leave behind the extractive economic model in favour of a transformational approach that respects our planetary boundaries.

In this memo, we have compiled at a topline level some of the key arguments against the need for deep-sea mining.

Read the memo here (PDF).

28 March, 2019

This is a joint submission to the fourteenth round of informal consultations of States Parties to the United Nations Agreement for the Implementation of the Provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 10 December 1982 relating to the Conservation and Management of Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks

These informal consultations focus on the topic “Performance reviews of regional fisheries management organizations and arrangements”

Submitted by: WWF, Greenpeace International, Deep Sea Conservation Coalition on 28 March 2019

Available in English.

6 September, 2016

Conservation of Deep-Sea Biodiversity in areas Beyond National Jurisdiction: A 10-Year Review of the Implementation of the UNGA Resolutions on Bottom Fisheries.

Available in English.

29 July, 2016

2016 is a big year for the deep sea. The DSCC has waged a decade-long campaign to drive robust implementation of the United Nations General Assembly resolutions committing high seas fishing nations to preventing damage to deep-sea ecosystems via a series of well-defined actions.

The passing of these resolutions has marked a critical turning point in our collective attitude to the deep oceans of the high seas and imposed the burden of ‘protection before exploitation’ on fishing nations. It has established a precedent, which could serve the wider oceans cause for decades to come.

Available in English (also available in double page version).