Biodiversity Beyond National Jurisdiction

7
Aug
2019

Source: Chinadialogue Ocean
Author: Li Jing

The ocean is home to millions of species, many of which are still unknown to humans. It supplies us with oxygen and each year absorbs nearly 25% of the greenhouse gases we produce by burning fossil fuels. However, vast areas of the high seas, which cover nearly half of the Earth’s surface, remain unregulated.

Continue reading High seas treaty: race for rights to ocean’s genetic resources

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11
Apr
2019

Source: World Economic Forum
Author: Johnny Wood

The total number of animals has halved since the 1970s in what some scientists have termed the start of Earth’s sixth mass extinction.

Seismic eruptions, ice ages, continental collision and asteroid impact are thought to be some of the causes of the previous five mass extinctions. This time though, humans are to blame. Never before has a single species exerted such influence on the planet and the evolution of its inhabitants, or put its own survival in such jeopardy.

Continue reading 3 reasons we should all care about biodiversity

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3
Apr
2019

Source: Science
Author: Alex Fox

No flag can claim the high seas, but many nations exploit them. As a result, life in the two-thirds of the oceans beyond any country’s territorial waters faces many threats that are largely unregulated, including overfishing and the emerging deep-sea mining industry.

Continue reading First ever high-seas conservation treaty would protect life in international waters

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3
Dec
2018

Source: Reuters
Author: Zoe Tabary

Ransom-hungry pirates, polar explorers, offshore oil giants – the race for the riches of the world’s final frontier is on.

From Thailand to Alaska, the battle to tap ever-dwindling resources from minerals to fish is spurring new conflicts over who has the right to the treasures of the deep seas.

Continue reading The final frontier: who owns the oceans and their hidden treasures?

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16
Oct
2018

Source: Nature Conservancy
Author: Maria Damanaki

There’s a proverb I’m fond of: “If you want to go fast, go alone; if you want to go far, go together.” I thought of this proverb as I followed the recent UN negotiations around a treaty to establish international governance for the high seas.

The high seas—the part of the ocean that lies outside of any national territory—cover almost 50 percent of the planet, but as of now they are subject to few regulations of any kind. The proposed UN treaty aims to establish guidelines “for the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction.” With three more negotiation sessions to come, the goal is to ratify by the spring of 2020.

Continue reading What Happens If We Don’t Protect the High Seas?

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5
Feb
2010

DSCC members attended the third ad hoc informal working group meeting of the United Nations General Assembly on biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction (known as BBNJ), at the United Nations 1st – 5th February 2010. The meeting was convened to study issues relating to the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity beyond areas of national jurisdiction.

Continue reading DSCC Members Attend UN Meeting on Biodiversity

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