Chile

20 June, 2022

During the meeting of States Parties to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea from 13-17 June at UN headquarters in New York, the government of Chile called for a 15 year moratorium on adopting regulations that would open the deep-sea in the international areas of the oceans to large-scale deep-sea mining.  


The international Seabed Authority (ISA) is currently engaged in an accelerated process of negotiating regulations to allow deep-sea mining with a view to finalizing and adopted the regulations by July 2023. Chile has called on the 167 countries that are members of the ISA to agree to extend this ‘deadline’ to adopt regulations for another 15 years. 

In a written submission to the meeting at the United Nations, Chile urged “That States Parties agree to extend the deadline for the elaboration of such rules, regulations and procedures [for allowing deep-sea mining], contained in subparagraph b of the aforementioned paragraph for a period of 15 years, in order to obtain more evidence and scientific certainty to ensure the protection of the marine environment.”

A spectacular group of Venus flower basket glass sponges (Euplectella aspergillum) glass sponges with a squat lobster in the middle.
Credit: NOAA

The submission highlighted the damage that deep-sea mining could cause if allowed to go ahead and the lack of sufficient scientific information to effectively monitor and prevent damage from deep-sea mining. It also pointed out that the global pandemic has prevented a thorough discussion on whether deep-sea mining should be allowed and, if so, under what circumstances. 

The Deep Sea Conservation welcomes Chile’s call for a moratorium for the reasons outlined in the submission and is also calling for a review and reform of the ISA, in particular its decision-making structure, to better reflect the obligation in the UN Law of the Sea that the ISA operation “for the benefit of” and “on behalf of” humankind as a whole.

Read the letter in full here.

18 December, 2017

Source: MercoPress

Chile’s Under secretariat of Fisheries and Aquaculture, SUBPESCA, and Oceana Chile jointly announced the freezing of the fishing footprint for the common hake and demersal crustacean fisheries. This means that 98% of Chile’s exclusive economic zone, EEZ, will be protected from bottom trawling.

Continue reading Chile bans bottom sea trawling in 98% of its EEZ to protect marine environment

14 January, 2013

Source: National Geographic

Author: Alex Munoz

I’m happy to start 2013 by sharing some inspiring news from my country, Chile, one of the world’s top fishing nations. The good news is that our Government and National Congress, following campaigning by Oceana, overhauled our fishing laws by banning bottom trawling in all vulnerable marine ecosystems (including all seamounts in Chile), requiring the implementation of reduction plans for bycatch and discards of ocean species, and ensuring that fishing quotas are based on science rather than politics.

Continue reading Chile Becomes First Country to Protect All Seamounts From Bottom Trawling

5 October, 2004

Deep sea bottom trawling has been compared to clearcutting ancient forests or using a bulldozer to catch rabbits. Campaigning to save the high seas from the most destructive form of fishing, the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition held press conferences in London, New York and Chile.

Continue reading Around the world, the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition calls for UN action to stop the deep sea destruction