deep sea species

12
Jun
2019

Source: Hakai Magazine
Author: Matt Koller

Nearly 180 kilometers off the coast of San Diego, California, there’s a surf break that, from time to time, spawns waves rising taller than two telephone poles stacked on top of each other. They inspire awe—and caution—in those driving the boats carrying big-wave surfers in search of the next world record. Yet there’s another hazard lurking in these waters: Bishop Rock, the summit of an enormous underwater mountain, lies just a meter or two below the surface. When the sea is particularly rough, Bishop Rock can poke its head through the troughs of larger swells.

Continue reading California Seamounts Are Sylvia Earle’s Newest “Hope Spots”

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6
Jun
2019

Source: National Geographic
Author: Laura Parker

For many years, scientists have tried to account for the amount of plastic waste that should be in the world’s oceans, given how much is estimated to leak into the seas every year. So far, the tally points to the largest concentrations on the surface and in coastal waters. But much of it remains “missing.”

And scientists can’t fully assess whatever harm plastics cause to the environment until they learn where they are. Now, new research off the California coast suggests an even larger plastics reservoir: deep offshore pelagic waters, the largest habitat on Earth.

Continue reading here.

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5
Jun
2019

Source: Science Magazine
Author: Helen Santoro

Five hundred meters below the ocean’s surface off the coast of California lives a creepy looking sea monster with a huge jaw and sharp rows of teeth. Even creepier, these teeth are transparent. Now, scientists think they know what makes them this way.

Continue reading The transparent teeth of this deep-sea dragonfish evolved for one lethal purpose

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26
Apr
2019

Source: Deutsche Well

Researchers recently explored hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California, up to 4,000 meters deep. DW spoke with marine biologist Greg Rouse about what kind of creatures live down there and how they manage to survive.

Continue reading here.

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19
Apr
2019

Source: Discover
Author: Kate Golembiewsk

We know more about the surface of the moon than about the ocean floor. Scientists estimate that 91 percent of life under the sea hasn’t been discovered yet and more than 80 percent of the ocean has never been explored. What we do know about the ocean makes it almost more mysterious. It’s an alien landscape, complete with undersea mountain ranges and trenches deeper than Mount Everest is tall, home to a glorious nightmare carnival of weird, often glowing animals.

Continue reading H.M.S. Challenger: Humanity’s First Real Glimpse of the Deep Oceans

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