deep sea

11
Apr
2019

Source: Phys.Org

DNA analysis recently confirmed that Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) scientists and their collaborators at OceanX, the University of Connecticut (UConn), and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) discovered two new species of deep-sea corals during a September 2018 expedition in the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Monument, located about 100 miles from the Northeast U.S. coast.

Continue reading New species of deep-sea corals discovered in Atlantic marine monument

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3
Apr
2019

Source: Science
Author: Alex Fox

No flag can claim the high seas, but many nations exploit them. As a result, life in the two-thirds of the oceans beyond any country’s territorial waters faces many threats that are largely unregulated, including overfishing and the emerging deep-sea mining industry.

Continue reading First ever high-seas conservation treaty would protect life in international waters

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27
Mar
2019

Source: USA News
Author: Cecelia Smith-Schoenwalder

For the first time, researchers have found microplastics in creatures that reside in the deepest parts of Earth’s oceans.

Researchers believe the discovery, outlined in a study published last month in the Royal Society Open Science journal, means that “it is highly likely there are no marine ecosystems left that are not impacted by plastic pollution.”

Continue reading Study Suggests Deep-Sea Creatures Are Eating Plastic

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25
Mar
2019

Source: Deep Sea News
Author: River Dixon

In the beginning, people mused the expansive oceans contained but a handful of organisms.  This idea started with Pliny the Elder, who lived in the first century AD. He wrote that there were only 176 species in the entirety of the ocean.  This was four less than Aristotle had already found, counted, and documented in just the Aegean Sea. Apparently, Pliny wasn’t a big fan of Aristotle’s work. One paper describes this writing of Pliny’s as “gossipy” and I would just like to take a minute to thank the powers that be that none of my scientific writing has yet been described this way.

Continue reading here.

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21
Mar
2019

Source: Amnesty International

Amnesty International is today publicly challenging leaders within the electric vehicle industry to make the world’s first completely ethical battery within five years. At the Nordic Electric Vehicle (EV) Summit in Oslo, the organization is highlighting how lithium-ion batteries, which power electric cars and electronics, are linked to human rights abuses including child labour in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and environmental risks which could undermine their green potential.

Continue reading Amnesty challenges industry leaders to clean up their batteries

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15
Mar
2019

Source: The Ecologist
Author: Amber Cobley

If you ask someone to describe the deep sea, the response is often a depressing description of a barren landscape devoid of life; one of such crushing pressure and eternal darkness that the chance of life surviving here seems only possible in stories of science fiction.

So, it would probably surprise you to hear that there are rich, deep-sea ecosystems under threat from an emerging ocean industry… and virtually no-one knows about it.

Continue reading Deep-sea mining: regulating the unknown

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10
Mar
2019

Source: Cnet
Author: Mark Serrels

University of Rhode Island shark researcher Bradley Wetherbee discovered a new type of Lantern shark while doing his doctorate in the 1990s, but it’s only in the last few years, almost 30 years later, that he’s been able to give that shark a name. And he named it after his daughter.

Continue reading A strange deep-sea shark gets a name, almost 30 years after discovery

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