exploration

11
Apr
2019

Source: Phys.Org

DNA analysis recently confirmed that Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) scientists and their collaborators at OceanX, the University of Connecticut (UConn), and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) discovered two new species of deep-sea corals during a September 2018 expedition in the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Monument, located about 100 miles from the Northeast U.S. coast.

Continue reading New species of deep-sea corals discovered in Atlantic marine monument

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25
Mar
2019

Source: Deep Sea News
Author: River Dixon

In the beginning, people mused the expansive oceans contained but a handful of organisms.  This idea started with Pliny the Elder, who lived in the first century AD. He wrote that there were only 176 species in the entirety of the ocean.  This was four less than Aristotle had already found, counted, and documented in just the Aegean Sea. Apparently, Pliny wasn’t a big fan of Aristotle’s work. One paper describes this writing of Pliny’s as “gossipy” and I would just like to take a minute to thank the powers that be that none of my scientific writing has yet been described this way.

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10
Mar
2019

Source: Cnet
Author: Mark Serrels

University of Rhode Island shark researcher Bradley Wetherbee discovered a new type of Lantern shark while doing his doctorate in the 1990s, but it’s only in the last few years, almost 30 years later, that he’s been able to give that shark a name. And he named it after his daughter.

Continue reading A strange deep-sea shark gets a name, almost 30 years after discovery

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4
Mar
2019

Source: Nature
Author: Cindy Lee Van Dover

Four decades have passed since vibrant clusters of giant, metre-long tubeworms, discovered at hot springs on the ocean floor by Corliss et al.1, were reported in Science. Until then, the ocean floor was considered to be more like a desert than an oasis.

Corliss and colleagues didn’t discover underwater hot springs by accident; rather, they were trying to discover whether the hypothesis that such sites existed was correct. Theories on the movements of tectonic plates had set the course for this discovery with the idea that the mountain ranges that girdle the globe on the ocean floor, called spreading centres, are volcanic sites at the boundaries of tectonic plates. A key clue to the existence of underwater hot springs was the unexpectedly low conductive heat flux in the ocean’s crust2. Convective heat flow through hot springs could solve the riddle of this missing heat. Warm-water anomalies documented above a spreading centre called Galapagos Ridge guided Corliss et al. to the site at which they discovered underwater hot springs (also called hydrothermal vents).

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28
Feb
2019

Source: ChinaDialogue Ocean
Author: Ned Pennant-Rea

The UN has described the deep sea as “the largest source of species and ecosystem diversity on Earth.” Life thrives particularly on the vast expanses of sea floor known as abyssal plains, amid the submarine mountains that rise from them and around superheated springs. Extremes of temperature and pressure have proved no obstacle to the creatures here. But plans to commercially mine the seabed pose a grave threat to their survival.

Continue reading Species threatened by deep-sea mining

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24
Jan
2019

Source: Sydney Morning Herald
Author: Liam Mannix

Under the Antarctic ice, in the pitch-black depths of the ocean, Australian scientists have discovered animals are evolving into strange and sometimes monstrous new shapes and forms.

Life, these scientists believe, is using the frigid Antarctic waters to experiment, and animals there are evolving at a much faster pace than anywhere else in the world.

Continue reading Down in the deep, beneath the Antarctic ice, a new strange world is rapidly forming

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18
Jan
2019

Source: Phys.Org

Oxygen—it’s a basic necessity for animal life. But marine biologists recently discovered large schools of fishes living in the dark depths of the Gulf of California where there is virtually no oxygen. Using an underwater robot, the scientists observed these fishes thriving in low-oxygen conditions that would be deadly to most other fish. This discovery could help scientists understand how other marine animals might cope with ongoing changes in the chemistry of the ocean.

Continue reading Biologists discover deep-sea fish living where there is virtually no oxygen

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19
Dec
2018

Source: Mongabay

South of Tasmania, hundreds of undersea mountains mark the deep ocean floor. Now, a monthlong survey of these seamounts in and around Australia’s Huon and Tasman Fracture marine parks has revealed a spectacular range of deep-sea species, from feathery corals and tulip-shaped glass sponges to bioluminescent squids and ghost sharks. The survey team has also uncovered more than 100 previously unnamed species that are likely new to science.

Continue reading Deep-sea survey of Australian marine parks reveals striking species

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