exploration

24
Jan
2019

Source: Sydney Morning Herald
Author: Liam Mannix

Under the Antarctic ice, in the pitch-black depths of the ocean, Australian scientists have discovered animals are evolving into strange and sometimes monstrous new shapes and forms.

Life, these scientists believe, is using the frigid Antarctic waters to experiment, and animals there are evolving at a much faster pace than anywhere else in the world.

Continue reading Down in the deep, beneath the Antarctic ice, a new strange world is rapidly forming

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18
Jan
2019

Source: Phys.Org

Oxygen—it’s a basic necessity for animal life. But marine biologists recently discovered large schools of fishes living in the dark depths of the Gulf of California where there is virtually no oxygen. Using an underwater robot, the scientists observed these fishes thriving in low-oxygen conditions that would be deadly to most other fish. This discovery could help scientists understand how other marine animals might cope with ongoing changes in the chemistry of the ocean.

Continue reading Biologists discover deep-sea fish living where there is virtually no oxygen

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19
Dec
2018

Source: Mongabay

South of Tasmania, hundreds of undersea mountains mark the deep ocean floor. Now, a monthlong survey of these seamounts in and around Australia’s Huon and Tasman Fracture marine parks has revealed a spectacular range of deep-sea species, from feathery corals and tulip-shaped glass sponges to bioluminescent squids and ghost sharks. The survey team has also uncovered more than 100 previously unnamed species that are likely new to science.

Continue reading Deep-sea survey of Australian marine parks reveals striking species

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14
Dec
2018

Source: EarthSky
Author: Sandra Brooke

When people think of coral reefs, they typically picture warm, clear waters with brightly colored corals and fishes. But other corals live in deep, dark, cold waters, often far from shore in remote locations. These varieties are just as ecologically important as their shallow water counterparts. They also are just as vulnerable to human activitieslike fishing and energy production.

Continue reading Huge previously-undetected coral reef off US East Coast

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10
Dec
2018

Source: National Geographic
Author: Sarah Gibbens

It felt a lot like a moon landing to the researchers who experienced it—descending thousands of feet below the surface of the ocean into complete darkness. Ambient ocean light extends down only about 600 feet. After that, no amount of straining your eyes will help you see through the inky blackness.

Scientist Tim Shank and photographer Luis Lamar were descending into Lydonia canyon, one of several among the canyons and underwater mountains sitting 130 miles from Massachusetts, when they were slowly surrounded by darkness.

Continue reading Exclusive photos show deep-sea canyon in U.S. waters teeming with life

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27
Nov
2018

Source: EurekAlert!

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin’s Marine Science Institute have discovered nearly two dozen new types of microbes, many of which use hydrocarbons such as methane and butane as energy sources to survive and grow–meaning the newly identified bacteria might be helping to limit the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and might one day be useful for cleaning up oil spills.

Continue reading Newly discovered deep-sea microbes gobble greenhouse gases and perhaps oil spills, too

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22
Nov
2018

Source: Phys.org
Author: Danica Coto

A rarely seen shark embryo. Corals up to 7 feet (2 meters) high. Sponges with sharp edges.

These were among the hundreds of findings reported by U.S.  who have wrapped up a 22-day mission exploring waters around Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in the deepest dives ever recorded in the region. Guided by other land-based scientists watching live feeds, they collected 89 samples and will now start to analyze them, Daniel Wagner, expedition coordinator with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

Continue reading Scientists wind up deep-water probes in Caribbean waters

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19
Nov
2018

Source: National Geographic
Author: Jessica Perelman

“95% of our oceans have never been explored.” This is a statistic that I hear regularly, and it holds a pretty strong message. What’s out there beneath the surface? How is the ocean changing? One of the greatest challenges in conveying the significance of the oceans is effective communication that goes beyond highly technical, hard-to-understand scientific literature. Science and public engagement are not mutually exclusive, and the value of great discoveries can only be realized if this connection is sustained. As humans we are natural story tellers, artists, musicians, inventors, and explorers. This is the toolbox that will foster enthusiasm and educate the global community about why the oceans are worth exploring- and protecting.

Continue reading All Hands on Deck: A (sea)grassroots approach to ocean exploration

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