fishing

14
Sep
2018

Source: NPR
Author: Alistair Bland

The jury is in on marine reserves: They work. Research has repeatedly shown that fish numbers quickly climb following well-enforced fishing bans, creating tangible benefits for fishers who work the surrounding waters. In fact, many experts believe fishing will only be sustainable if marine reserves are expanded significantly.

That’s why some activists and scientists are now discussing the idea of creating a marine reserve so big it would cover most of the ocean. Specifically, they want fishing banned in international waters.

Continue reading Could A Ban On Fishing In International Waters Become A Reality?

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10
Sep
2018

Source: Hakai Magazine
Author: Marcus Woo

Recent research suggests fisheries closures would have minimal effect on global food security, but some scientists think the case isn’t so clear cut.

Far offshore are the high seas—waters beyond any country’s jurisdiction and the focus of a contentious debate. The high seas, which cover nearly two-thirds of the ocean’s surface, have recently seen an increase in fishing and other activities, such as deep-sea mining. To protect the biodiversity of this vast environment, delegates attending a meeting currently underway in New York are negotiating for a new international treaty, an addition to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

Continue reading Closing the High Seas to Fishing Probably Won’t Hurt Global Food Security

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5
Sep
2018

Source: BBC
Author: Matt McGrath

The first significant steps towards legally protecting the high seas are to take place at the UN in New York.

These waters, defined as the open ocean far from coastlines, are threatened by deep-sea mining, over-fishing and the patenting of marine genetic resources.

Over the next two years, government representatives aim to hammer out a binding agreement to protect them against over-exploitation.

Continue reading UN Treaty Would Protect High Seas from Over Exploitation

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15
Sep
2017

High seas fishing nations, members of the North Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO), will hold their annual meeting this week, September 18-22 in Montreal, Canada. The Ecology Action Centre, a member of the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition and the Shark League for the Atlantic and Mediterranean, will participate as an environmental non-government observer.

Continue reading Conservationists Call for Greater Protections for North Atlantic Ecosystem at Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization Annual Meeting

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29
Mar
2017

Source: Croatia Week

On the eve of the Ministerial Conference on Mediterranean Fisheries (Malta, 29-30 March 2017) Greenpeace in Croatia, NAŠ Jadran, Ad Adriaticum, BIOM, Clean Adriatic Sea Alliance, Eco Hvar, Udruga Održivi Otok, and Udruga Zdravi Grad urge Minister Tomislav Tolušic to promote the full protection of the Jabuka Pit from bottom trawling and set longliners.

Continue reading Fishery in the Adriatic: Last Call for Jabuka Pit – Croatia Must Play its Part

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25
Jan
2017

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science

Authors: Les Watling and Peter J. Auster

The ecological sustainability of fishing in the deep sea, in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), rose to the attention of the member States of the United Nations and elicited action in 2004 and then more strongly in 2006 (Gianni et al., 2011). Mounting evidence of the effects of fishing in the deep sea, such as the destruction of deep sea coral communities at sites around the globe, and the slow growth, time to maturity and tremendous age reached by some species of deep sea fish, caused many to consider the sustainability of common fishing practices. 

Continue reading Seamounts on the High Seas Should Be Managed as Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems

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4
Jan
2017

Source: New Economics Foundation
Author: Griffin Carpenter

Fisheries ministers risk damaging our natural resources beyond repair by consistently setting fishing limits above scientific advice. This is our third year running a series of briefings to identify which Member States are standing in the way of more fish, more profits, and more jobs for European citizens.

Continue reading Landing The Blame – Overfishing In The Deep Sea 2017-18

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