hydrothermal vent

2
Nov
2018

Source: Phys.Org
Author: Priyanka Runwal

Almost 4,000 meters below the sea surface, in the southern Pescadero Basin, jagged ivory towers rise from the seafloor and emit hot shimmering fluid. They are the deepest known hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California.

These deep-sea chimneys were discovered by MBARI scientists in 2015. The researchers call them the Auka vents. What’s intriguing is that these vents spew chemicals and host animals that are very different from those seen at Alarcón Rise, which is just 100 miles away.

Continue reading Researchers help map and scout for hydrothermal vents in Gulf of California

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28
Sep
2018

Source: Bloomburg BNA
Author: Adam Ellington and Stephan Lee

Once thought too expensive and too difficult, commercial scale mining of the deep sea is poised to become a reality as early as 2019. But scientists warn reaching rare minerals on and under the sea floor could cause irreversible damage to an environment that is still poorly understood.

Continue reading Deep-Sea Mining for Rare-Earth Metals Looms, as Do Environmental Questions

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18
Sep
2018
Source: lostcity.biology.utah.edu

A deep-sea expedition to the Lost City hydrothermal field begins in September 2018. The Lost City is a beautiful seafloor formation whose unique scientific and cultural value has brought it under consideration for special protection by the UNESCO World Heritage Centre and International Union for Conservation of Nature. The Lost City is also featured in many studies on the origin of life and the search for life in the solar system. This will be the first US expedition dedicated to the Lost City since the 2003-2005 expeditions.

Continue reading Return to the Lost City 2018

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10
Jul
2018

Source: Duke University
Contact: Tim Lucas (919) 613-8084 tdlucas@duke.edu

DURHAM, N.C. – An international team of researchers has developed a comprehensive set of criteria to help the International Seabed Authority (ISA) protect local biodiversity from deep-sea mining activities. These guidelines should help identify areas of particular environmental importance where no mining should occur.

Continue reading A Strategy for making ‘No-Mining Zones’- in the Deep Sea

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1
Jun
2018

Source: Creamer Media’s Mining Weekly
Author: Dylan Slater

Deep-sea mining is yet to become a major activity, and not much is known about undersea mineral deposits. However, some in the mining industry claim that the deep seafloor could be host to an abundant, untapped resource of highly sought-after commodities that may be relatively easy to access once machinery has been developed to operate under high pressures in submerged environments and salty water.

Continue reading Canada’s Nautilus aiming to start marine mining in 2019 despite enviro concerns

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20
May
2018

Source: EurekAlert!
Kumamoto University

A new species of microcrustacean (Stygiopontius ) was collected from a submarine hot spring (hydrothermal vent) of a volcanic seamount (Myojin-sho caldera) in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. This crustacean group lives only around deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the central Atlantic or eastern Pacific Oceans. The new species is the first of its kind discovered in Japanese waters. Reina Senokuchi, a Kumamoto University student, was the first to make the discovery saying, “When I realized that it might be a new species, I was both delighted and very surprised. I couldn’t believe it was true.”

Continue reading Japanese student discovers new crustacean species in deep sea hydrothermal vent

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