International Seabed Authority

27
Jul
2018

The Deep Sea Conservation Coalition (DSCC) this week called on the International Seabed Authority (ISA), which has just concluded its annual meeting this week, to ensure effective protection of the ocean and ensure full public transparency. The DSCC also called for a broad public debate on opening up the deep ocean to seabed mining as part of the Strategic Plan adopted by the ISA on Thursday.

Continue reading DSCC calls on International Seabed Authority to ensure protection of the ocean and transparent, open debate

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16
Jul
2018

Mining the deep sea for metals such as copper, cobalt, nickel, manganese and silver may move a step closer this year as the countries that are members of the International Seabed Authority (ISA) continue to draft regulations to allow commercial deep-sea mining. The ISA is the United Nations (UN) body charged with managing seabed mining in the half of the world’s ocean that lies beyond the jurisdiction of any individual nation. As envisaged, such mining would be on a scale that will dwarf any mining undertaken on land.

Continue reading Conservation Groups Call on Countries Participating in the Meeting of the International Seabed Authority to Ensure Transparency and Protect Deep-Sea Biodiversity

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13
Jul
2018

Source: IASS Potsdam

How could the exploitation of the resources of the deep seabed conceivably benefit humanity? What risks does such exploitation pose to the marine environment? And how can we ensure that governance in this area is fair – for all of humankind? The latest IASS Policy Brief examines what the International Seabed Authority can do to reconcile the use of the ‘common heritage of mankind’ with the global sustainable development goals formulated in the 2030 Agenda.

Continue reading Benefit Sharing and the Common Heritage of Mankind: Policy Brief Makes Recommendations for the Governance of Deep Seabed Mining

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11
Jul
2018

Source: Nature

The biggest deep-sea mining operation so far was a cold-war ruse. In 1974, the US Central Intelligence Agency launched an elaborate operation to recover a Soviet submarine northwest of Hawaii, under the cover of a commercial venture to mine manganese nodules located on the sea floor. The spooks got a piece of the submarine but left any valuable minerals in the area for future prospectors.

Continue reading Governments must weigh the environmental costs of deep-sea mining

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10
Jul
2018

Source: Duke University
Contact: Tim Lucas (919) 613-8084 tdlucas@duke.edu

DURHAM, N.C. – An international team of researchers has developed a comprehensive set of criteria to help the International Seabed Authority (ISA) protect local biodiversity from deep-sea mining activities. These guidelines should help identify areas of particular environmental importance where no mining should occur.

Continue reading A Strategy for making ‘No-Mining Zones’- in the Deep Sea

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