mining

3
Apr
2019

Source: Science
Author: Alex Fox

No flag can claim the high seas, but many nations exploit them. As a result, life in the two-thirds of the oceans beyond any country’s territorial waters faces many threats that are largely unregulated, including overfishing and the emerging deep-sea mining industry.

Continue reading First ever high-seas conservation treaty would protect life in international waters

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21
Mar
2019

Source: Amnesty International

Amnesty International is today publicly challenging leaders within the electric vehicle industry to make the world’s first completely ethical battery within five years. At the Nordic Electric Vehicle (EV) Summit in Oslo, the organization is highlighting how lithium-ion batteries, which power electric cars and electronics, are linked to human rights abuses including child labour in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and environmental risks which could undermine their green potential.

Continue reading Amnesty challenges industry leaders to clean up their batteries

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15
Mar
2019

Source: The Ecologist
Author: Amber Cobley

If you ask someone to describe the deep sea, the response is often a depressing description of a barren landscape devoid of life; one of such crushing pressure and eternal darkness that the chance of life surviving here seems only possible in stories of science fiction.

So, it would probably surprise you to hear that there are rich, deep-sea ecosystems under threat from an emerging ocean industry… and virtually no-one knows about it.

Continue reading Deep-sea mining: regulating the unknown

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15
Mar
2019

Source: Nature
Author: Olive Heffernan

For decades, mining companies have been eager to extract rare and valuable metals and minerals from the deep sea — a practice that scientists have long warned could damage marine ecosystems. Now, the first large-scale test of a major industrial-mining technique promises to provide robust data on the impacts of the controversial practice.

Continue reading Scientists track damage from controversial deep-sea mining method

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11
Mar
2019

Source: Papua New Guinea Mine Watch

On 21 February 2019, Nautilus Minerals Inc. filed for protection from creditors under the Canadian Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act.  Whilst claiming this as a victory in their decade-long campaign to stop the Nautilus Solwara 1 Project in the Bismarck Sea, local communities and civil society in Papua New Guinea are taking heed that the fight is not over until all Nautilus licences are cancelled.

Continue reading Call for Nautilus seabed mining licences to be cancelled in Papua New Guinea

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3
Mar
2019

Source: ABC News
Author: Antony Funnell

In 2005 a US nuclear submarine hit something solid south-east of Guam. It was reportedly operating at full speed at a depth of about 160 metres when the collision occurred. The nose of the USS San Francisco was so severely damaged that the craft had trouble surfacing. The accident injured 98 submariners. One subsequently died.

It was later revealed the obstacle wasn’t a rival vessel, as speculated, but a large undersea hill. The incident caused huge embarrassment for the world’s most powerful military, but it also reinforced how little we still know about the underwater environment.

Continue reading here.

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