Nautilus Papua New Guinea

24
Apr
2019

Source: Act Now PNG

The risks and uncertainties of experimental seabed mining are too great to allow this industry to ever proceed in Papua New Guinea. 

This was the view shared by seabed mining advocates, together with locals of West Coast Namatanai and representatives of Duke of York Islands, East New Britain Province, during an open forum in Namatanai.

After the gathering, a joint statement was issued, saying: “As New Irelanders we have two world class mining in Lihir and Simberi gold mine. We have logging operations and oil palm industry operating in the Province. We have run down plantations that can be used for cocoa or copra project that support local people.

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11
Mar
2019

Source: Papua New Guinea Mine Watch

On 21 February 2019, Nautilus Minerals Inc. filed for protection from creditors under the Canadian Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act.  Whilst claiming this as a victory in their decade-long campaign to stop the Nautilus Solwara 1 Project in the Bismarck Sea, local communities and civil society in Papua New Guinea are taking heed that the fight is not over until all Nautilus licences are cancelled.

Continue reading Call for Nautilus seabed mining licences to be cancelled in Papua New Guinea

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1
Mar
2019

Source: The Globe and Mail
Author: Amy O’Kruk

Deep in the North Pacific Ocean, in an area as wide as the United States, billions of potato-sized rocks litter the ocean floor. These lumpy, black-brown balls are full of cobalt, nickel, copper and manganese – valuable minerals that are crucial for electronics and evolving green technologies, such as electric cars and solar panels.

Continue reading The new frontier: deep-sea mining

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19
Feb
2019

Source: The Conversation

“When they start mining the seabed, they’ll start mining part of me.”

These are the words of a clan chief of the Duke of York Islands – a small archipelago in the Bismarck Sea of Papua New Guinea which lies 30km from the world’s first commercial deep sea mine site, known as “Solwara 1”. The project, which has been delayed due to funding difficulties, is operated by Canadian company Nautilus Minerals and is poised to extract copper from the seabed, 1600m below the surface.

Continue reading Deep sea mining threatens indigenous culture in Papua New Guinea

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