Papua New Guinea

24
Apr
2019

Source: Act Now PNG

The risks and uncertainties of experimental seabed mining are too great to allow this industry to ever proceed in Papua New Guinea. 

This was the view shared by seabed mining advocates, together with locals of West Coast Namatanai and representatives of Duke of York Islands, East New Britain Province, during an open forum in Namatanai.

After the gathering, a joint statement was issued, saying: “As New Irelanders we have two world class mining in Lihir and Simberi gold mine. We have logging operations and oil palm industry operating in the Province. We have run down plantations that can be used for cocoa or copra project that support local people.

Continue reading here.

Share this article:
11
Mar
2019

Source: Papua New Guinea Mine Watch

On 21 February 2019, Nautilus Minerals Inc. filed for protection from creditors under the Canadian Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act.  Whilst claiming this as a victory in their decade-long campaign to stop the Nautilus Solwara 1 Project in the Bismarck Sea, local communities and civil society in Papua New Guinea are taking heed that the fight is not over until all Nautilus licences are cancelled.

Continue reading Call for Nautilus seabed mining licences to be cancelled in Papua New Guinea

Share this article:
19
Feb
2019

Source: The Conversation

“When they start mining the seabed, they’ll start mining part of me.”

These are the words of a clan chief of the Duke of York Islands – a small archipelago in the Bismarck Sea of Papua New Guinea which lies 30km from the world’s first commercial deep sea mine site, known as “Solwara 1”. The project, which has been delayed due to funding difficulties, is operated by Canadian company Nautilus Minerals and is poised to extract copper from the seabed, 1600m below the surface.

Continue reading Deep sea mining threatens indigenous culture in Papua New Guinea

Share this article:
5
Jan
2019

Source: Loop Business

The clock is ticking for Nautilus Minerals. The company has been struggling for some time as it seeks to force through the first experimental deep sea mining project, Solwara 1, off the coast of Papua New Guinea, despite concerted opposition.

Continue reading here.

Share this article:
19
Dec
2018

Source: DSM Observer
Author: Andrew Thaler

2018 was supposed to be the year for Nautilus Minerals. Their three seafloor production tools—large underwater robots capable of mining seafloor massive sulphides from 1600 meters depth—were finally in hand and undergoing submerged testing. Their ship, the Nautilus New Era, was nearing completion. They had only a few hurdles left to clear before beginning production at Solwara I, the much-vaunted site of the world’s first deep sea mining operation.

Then the floor dropped out.

Continue reading For Nautilus Minerals, the debt comes due.

Share this article: