seabed

18
Jan
2019

Source: Phys.Org

Oxygen—it’s a basic necessity for animal life. But marine biologists recently discovered large schools of fishes living in the dark depths of the Gulf of California where there is virtually no oxygen. Using an underwater robot, the scientists observed these fishes thriving in low-oxygen conditions that would be deadly to most other fish. This discovery could help scientists understand how other marine animals might cope with ongoing changes in the chemistry of the ocean.

Continue reading Biologists discover deep-sea fish living where there is virtually no oxygen

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11
Dec
2018

Source: Mining Watch Canada

Nautilus Minerals’ aspirations to be the world’s first deep sea mining company sink to the bottom of the ocean on news that the project support vessel critical to the development of the company’s deep sea mining project in Papua New Guinea has been purchased for repurposing by Indian company MDL Energy.

Continue reading GAME OVER! Papua New Guinea Deep Sea Mining Experiment Fails

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27
Nov
2018

Source: EurekAlert!

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin’s Marine Science Institute have discovered nearly two dozen new types of microbes, many of which use hydrocarbons such as methane and butane as energy sources to survive and grow–meaning the newly identified bacteria might be helping to limit the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and might one day be useful for cleaning up oil spills.

Continue reading Newly discovered deep-sea microbes gobble greenhouse gases and perhaps oil spills, too

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23
Nov
2018

Source: Sputnik News

The International Seabed Authority is drawing up new rules on the exploitation of the seabed by deep sea mining companies. Sputnik spoke to Ann Dom, Deputy Director of Seas At Risk, and two deep sea mining companies about the risks of trawling for metals on the ocean floor.

Global demand for cobalt, copper, nickel and manganese is booming as they are required in the production of electric batteries and clean energy technology and companies are now looking at the ocean as a possible source of these minerals.

Continue reading ‘Deep Sea Mining Could Rob us of Cure for Cancer’, Say Conservationists

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20
Nov
2018

Source: The National
Author: Kirsteen Paterson

Gas-absorbing deep sea bacteria are soaking up carbon dioxide – and mining could create major problems, Scots scientists say.

As many as 16 contractors from countries including the UK, Germany, France and Korea have secured exploration rights to the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone (CCFZ) in the Pacific Ocean.

Continue reading Scientists warn against deep-sea mining after key carbon cycle discovery

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19
Nov
2018

Source: Honolulu Civil Beat
Author: Stewart Yerton

Critics fear rules for opening a swath of ocean bed between Mexico and Hawaii won’t protect “the most pristine wilderness on the planet.”

Deep on the floor of the Pacific Ocean, amidst one of earth’s greatest unexploited reserves of valuable minerals, are ecosystems of otherworldly creatures.

There are fast-moving sea urchins; anemones that perch like flowers atop long sponge stalks; translucent, tentacled sea cucumbers that look like something from Pokemon, and yellow gelatinous critters that University of Hawaii oceanographers have nicknamed “Gummy Squirrels.”

Continue reading Rushing To Mine A Sea Floor Full Of Treasure — And Unique Creatures

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14
Nov
2018

Source: Financial Times
Author: Henry Sanderson

Miners want to tap subsea cobalt deposits for green technologies, but environmentalists worry.

Gerard Barron brandishes a small black rock — the size of the palm of his hand — and heralds it as the future: “It’s all right here, all the metals we need.”

The Australian entrepreneur believes these rocks, formed over millions of years at the bottom of the ocean, can help satisfy the growing demand for the metals used in batteries and clean energy technologies, and are therefore critical to the transition away from fossil fuels. Less than 20cm wide, the so-called nodules can contain nickel, manganese, copper and cobalt— all set to see a surge in demand over the next decade.

Continue reading Electric vehicles spur race to mine deep sea riches

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14
Nov
2018

Source: Reuters
Author: Barbara Lewis

China, the leading holder of international deep sea exploration licences, has increased its lead in the race for alternative sources of battery minerals by taking samples from cobalt-bearing mountains deep in the Pacific.

The cobalt-rich crusts could one day curb the world’s dependence on cobalt from Democratic Republic of Congo, but most companies say deep sea mining is a distant prospect.

Continue reading China plumbs ocean depths to extend its cobalt lead

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13
Nov
2018

Source: Papua New Guinea Mine Watch

On 17-18 November, 21 heads of state will come to Port Moresby for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. Set against a backdrop of debts and a declining economy the Nautilus Solwara 1 project speaks volume to another PNG Government failed investment that will be a further economic burden to the country.

Sir Arnold Amet, former Papua New Guinean Attorney General and Minister for Justice Papua New Guinea, “Nautilus is propped up by USD 15 million in loans from its two major shareholders, it’s been forced to reduce its workforce and to terminate contracts for the construction of equipment.”[1]

Continue reading Nautilus Solwara 1 on the verge of bankruptcy as APEC Summit heads to Papua New Guinea

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