seamount

19
Jan
2018

Source: Council of the Haida Nation 

Haida Gwaii, British Columbia – The Haida Nation and the Government of Canada have agreed to increase the level of protection at the SGaan Kinghlas – Bowie Seamount Marine Protected Area (MPA) by closing all bottom-contact fishing. This closure shows a precautionary management approach to protection of sensitive benthic habitats in support of the MPA objectives.

Continue reading Haida Nation and Canada increase protection at the SG̲aan K̲inghlas – Bowie Seamount Marine Protected Area

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15
Dec
2017

Source: Marine Conservation Institute 
Author: Kelly Martin

You’ve probably heard the saying that we know less about the deep ocean than we do about the surface of the moon. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, we have explored less than 5% of the ocean to date, so the saying is pretty accurate. However, as technology improves and scientists are able to learn more about the deep, they begin to more clearly understand its ecological value.

Continue reading The Future of the Deep Sea: Undiscovered Wonders at Risk

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12
Dec
2017

Source: Marine Conservation Institute 
Author: Sam Georgian

Seamounts are underwater mountains rising thousands of feet from the bottom of the ocean. Due to their size and shape, seamounts exert a strong influence on local currents that results in nutrient enrichment and increased food supply. As a result, these massive features are often highly productive ‘oases’ in the deep sea, supporting a large diversity of species including functionally important deep-sea corals (Stocks and Hart 2007). Deep-sea corals provide essential habitat structures for a large number of associated organisms, including many commercially important fish. These communities are currently at risk from a number of threats including climate change, oil and gas extraction, and benthic fisheries.

Continue reading Needle in a haystack: identifying vulnerable marine ecosystems in the deep sea

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4
Aug
2017

Source: Scientific America
Author: Shannon Hall

Two years ago, Shana Goffredi raced to the control room of the R/V Western Flyer, a 117-foot-long research ship in the Gulf of California. Television monitors onboard the vessel displayed what looked like an alien world near the ocean bottom, and Goffredi wanted to get a better look.

Continue reading Bizarro Life-Forms Inhabiting Deep-Sea Vents May Be at Risk

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24
Jul
2017

Source: Science Daily
Author: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Despite being relatively close together, two recently discovered hydrothermal vent fields in the Gulf of California host very different animal communities. This finding contradicts a common scientific assumption that neighboring vents will share similar animal communities, and suggests that local geology and vent-fluid chemistry are important factors affecting vent communities.

Continue reading Challenging prevailing theory about how deep-sea vents are colonized

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20
Jul
2017

Source: New Scientist
Author: Karl Gruber

In the depths of the ocean, life can extend far beyond its usual limits. Take the tube worm Escarpia laminata: living in an environment with a year-round abundance of food and no predators, individuals seem to live for over 300 years. And some may be 1000 years old or more – meaning they would have been around when William the Conqueror invaded England.

Continue reading Giant deep-sea worms may live to be 1000 years old or more

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9
Jun
2017

Source: The Ocean Conference UN

In respect of the UN Oceans Conference, the DSCC is calling on high seas fishing nations to fully and effectively protect deep-sea ecosystems from ‘significant adverse impacts’ of deep-sea fisheries, including through prohibiting bottom trawling on seamounts, as they have committed to do by implementing UNGA resolutions adopted since 2006. This would be a significant contribution to meeting SDG 14.2 and its target date of 2020 to protect marine ecosystems from significant adverse impacts, strengthen their resilience, and achieve healthy and productive oceans.

Continue reading The UN Ocean Conference

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25
Jan
2017

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science

Authors: Les Watling and Peter J. Auster

The ecological sustainability of fishing in the deep sea, in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), rose to the attention of the member States of the United Nations and elicited action in 2004 and then more strongly in 2006 (Gianni et al., 2011). Mounting evidence of the effects of fishing in the deep sea, such as the destruction of deep sea coral communities at sites around the globe, and the slow growth, time to maturity and tremendous age reached by some species of deep sea fish, caused many to consider the sustainability of common fishing practices. 

Continue reading Seamounts on the High Seas Should Be Managed as Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems

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