Solwara

24
Apr
2019

Source: Act Now PNG

The risks and uncertainties of experimental seabed mining are too great to allow this industry to ever proceed in Papua New Guinea. 

This was the view shared by seabed mining advocates, together with locals of West Coast Namatanai and representatives of Duke of York Islands, East New Britain Province, during an open forum in Namatanai.

After the gathering, a joint statement was issued, saying: “As New Irelanders we have two world class mining in Lihir and Simberi gold mine. We have logging operations and oil palm industry operating in the Province. We have run down plantations that can be used for cocoa or copra project that support local people.

Continue reading here.

Share this article:
19
Feb
2019

Source: The Conversation

“When they start mining the seabed, they’ll start mining part of me.”

These are the words of a clan chief of the Duke of York Islands – a small archipelago in the Bismarck Sea of Papua New Guinea which lies 30km from the world’s first commercial deep sea mine site, known as “Solwara 1”. The project, which has been delayed due to funding difficulties, is operated by Canadian company Nautilus Minerals and is poised to extract copper from the seabed, 1600m below the surface.

Continue reading Deep sea mining threatens indigenous culture in Papua New Guinea

Share this article:
26
Dec
2018

Source: Mongabay
Author: David Hutt

An ambitious plan to mine precious minerals from the ocean floor off the coast of Papua New Guinea looks to have run aground due to the developer’s financial problems.

In 2011, the government of Papua New Guinea granted Canada-based Nautilus Minerals a 20-year mining license covering roughly 500,000 square kilometers (193,000 square miles) of the Bismarck Sea, off the country’s eastern coast. The Solwara 1 project was the first in the world to be granted rights for deep-sea mining, whereby enormous machines would dig into the ocean floor, harvesting zinc, copper and gold, and other commodities essential to building electrical equipment.

Continue reading After the loss of a ship, deep sea mining plans for PNG founder

Share this article:
19
Dec
2018

Source: DSM Observer
Author: Andrew Thaler

2018 was supposed to be the year for Nautilus Minerals. Their three seafloor production tools—large underwater robots capable of mining seafloor massive sulphides from 1600 meters depth—were finally in hand and undergoing submerged testing. Their ship, the Nautilus New Era, was nearing completion. They had only a few hurdles left to clear before beginning production at Solwara I, the much-vaunted site of the world’s first deep sea mining operation.

Then the floor dropped out.

Continue reading For Nautilus Minerals, the debt comes due.

Share this article:
11
Dec
2018

Source: Mining Watch Canada

Nautilus Minerals’ aspirations to be the world’s first deep sea mining company sink to the bottom of the ocean on news that the project support vessel critical to the development of the company’s deep sea mining project in Papua New Guinea has been purchased for repurposing by Indian company MDL Energy.

Continue reading GAME OVER! Papua New Guinea Deep Sea Mining Experiment Fails

Share this article:
6
Dec
2018

Source: The Economist

After listing on the Toronto stock exchange in 2006 Nautilus Minerals became the public face of a daring new industry: deep-sea mining. It planned to pursue riches on the ocean floor, mining metals such as gold, zinc and copper, desired for lustre, alloys and electronics. Robotic machines (pictured) would cut, grind and gather volcanic rock at a site called Solwara 1, located 1,600 metres beneath the surface of the Bismarck Sea near Papua New Guinea (png). The resultant rocky slurry would be pumped up to a support vessel, then shipped to a site at which the metals could be extracted. Investors were convinced; Nautilus’s shares doubled from their initial price of c$2 ($1.80) in a few months.

Continue reading A high-profile deep-sea mining company is struggling

Share this article: