UNGA

14
Sep
2018

Source: NPR
Author: Alistair Bland

The jury is in on marine reserves: They work. Research has repeatedly shown that fish numbers quickly climb following well-enforced fishing bans, creating tangible benefits for fishers who work the surrounding waters. In fact, many experts believe fishing will only be sustainable if marine reserves are expanded significantly.

That’s why some activists and scientists are now discussing the idea of creating a marine reserve so big it would cover most of the ocean. Specifically, they want fishing banned in international waters.

Continue reading Could A Ban On Fishing In International Waters Become A Reality?

Share this article:
10
Sep
2018

Source: Hakai Magazine
Author: Marcus Woo

Recent research suggests fisheries closures would have minimal effect on global food security, but some scientists think the case isn’t so clear cut.

Far offshore are the high seas—waters beyond any country’s jurisdiction and the focus of a contentious debate. The high seas, which cover nearly two-thirds of the ocean’s surface, have recently seen an increase in fishing and other activities, such as deep-sea mining. To protect the biodiversity of this vast environment, delegates attending a meeting currently underway in New York are negotiating for a new international treaty, an addition to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

Continue reading Closing the High Seas to Fishing Probably Won’t Hurt Global Food Security

Share this article:
5
Sep
2018

Source: BBC
Author: Matt McGrath

The first significant steps towards legally protecting the high seas are to take place at the UN in New York.

These waters, defined as the open ocean far from coastlines, are threatened by deep-sea mining, over-fishing and the patenting of marine genetic resources.

Over the next two years, government representatives aim to hammer out a binding agreement to protect them against over-exploitation.

Continue reading UN Treaty Would Protect High Seas from Over Exploitation

Share this article:
9
Jun
2017

Source: The Ocean Conference UN

In respect of the UN Oceans Conference, the DSCC is calling on high seas fishing nations to fully and effectively protect deep-sea ecosystems from ‘significant adverse impacts’ of deep-sea fisheries, including through prohibiting bottom trawling on seamounts, as they have committed to do by implementing UNGA resolutions adopted since 2006. This would be a significant contribution to meeting SDG 14.2 and its target date of 2020 to protect marine ecosystems from significant adverse impacts, strengthen their resilience, and achieve healthy and productive oceans.

Continue reading The UN Ocean Conference

Share this article:
25
Jan
2017

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science

Authors: Les Watling and Peter J. Auster

The ecological sustainability of fishing in the deep sea, in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), rose to the attention of the member States of the United Nations and elicited action in 2004 and then more strongly in 2006 (Gianni et al., 2011). Mounting evidence of the effects of fishing in the deep sea, such as the destruction of deep sea coral communities at sites around the globe, and the slow growth, time to maturity and tremendous age reached by some species of deep sea fish, caused many to consider the sustainability of common fishing practices. 

Continue reading Seamounts on the High Seas Should Be Managed as Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems

Share this article:
13
Dec
2016

The European Parliament today concluded a long process of negotiation by voting to adopt a new regulation on deep-sea fishing, including a ban on bottom trawling below 800 meters in EU waters, and an obligation to close deep-sea areas to bottom fishing to protect vulnerable marine ecosystems (VMEs). The Parliament vote to approve the regulation paves the way for its entry into force early in the new year. The priority now is to ensure vigorous and effective implementation.

Continue reading Conservationists urge full implementation of new EU regulation on deep-sea fishing formally adopted today

Share this article:
9
Nov
2016

Negotiations are currently underway at the UN in NYC to decide the fisheries resolutions which will go before the General Assembly next month. On November 9th & 10th the highly destructive practice of bottom fishing in the deep ocean will be under scrutiny. Following a review earlier this year to consider the implementation of previous resolutions seeking to control the negative impact, the DSCC is calling for bottom fishing on seamounts to be stopped to preserve fragile habitats.  A resolution proposed by South Africa supports this and also calls for a further review in 2020.  This and other proposals will be discussed over the coming two days.

Continue reading Ten Years On It’s Time To Protect The Seamounts

Share this article: