UNGA

9
Jun
2017

Source: The Ocean Conference UN

In respect of the UN Oceans Conference, the DSCC is calling on high seas fishing nations to fully and effectively protect deep-sea ecosystems from ‘significant adverse impacts’ of deep-sea fisheries, including through prohibiting bottom trawling on seamounts, as they have committed to do by implementing UNGA resolutions adopted since 2006. This would be a significant contribution to meeting SDG 14.2 and its target date of 2020 to protect marine ecosystems from significant adverse impacts, strengthen their resilience, and achieve healthy and productive oceans.

Continue reading The UN Ocean Conference

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25
Jan
2017

Source: Frontiers in Marine Science

Authors: Les Watling and Peter J. Auster

The ecological sustainability of fishing in the deep sea, in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), rose to the attention of the member States of the United Nations and elicited action in 2004 and then more strongly in 2006 (Gianni et al., 2011). Mounting evidence of the effects of fishing in the deep sea, such as the destruction of deep sea coral communities at sites around the globe, and the slow growth, time to maturity and tremendous age reached by some species of deep sea fish, caused many to consider the sustainability of common fishing practices. 

Continue reading Seamounts on the High Seas Should Be Managed as Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems

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13
Dec
2016

The European Parliament today concluded a long process of negotiation by voting to adopt a new regulation on deep-sea fishing, including a ban on bottom trawling below 800 meters in EU waters, and an obligation to close deep-sea areas to bottom fishing to protect vulnerable marine ecosystems (VMEs). The Parliament vote to approve the regulation paves the way for its entry into force early in the new year. The priority now is to ensure vigorous and effective implementation.

Continue reading Conservationists urge full implementation of new EU regulation on deep-sea fishing formally adopted today

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9
Nov
2016

Negotiations are currently underway at the UN in NYC to decide the fisheries resolutions which will go before the General Assembly next month. On November 9th & 10th the highly destructive practice of bottom fishing in the deep ocean will be under scrutiny. Following a review earlier this year to consider the implementation of previous resolutions seeking to control the negative impact, the DSCC is calling for bottom fishing on seamounts to be stopped to preserve fragile habitats.  A resolution proposed by South Africa supports this and also calls for a further review in 2020.  This and other proposals will be discussed over the coming two days.

Continue reading Ten Years On It’s Time To Protect The Seamounts

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23
Sep
2016

Varadero, Cuba—The 38th Annual Meeting of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) concluded today in Varadero, Cuba. This year, expectations were high that NAFO Contracting Parties would take further measures to protect elements of the marine ecosystem and vulnerable sharks and skates, and environmentalists at the Ecology Action Centre, who attended as the only civil society observers, are pleased to see that some of these measures will be moving forward.  

Continue reading High Seas Fisheries Organization Agrees to Important Conservation Measures, Closes a New Area to Bottom Fishing & Adopts Policy to Further Prevent Shark Finning

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17
Aug
2016

Source: The Pew Charitable Trusts

A patchwork of international bodies and treaties manage ocean resources and human activity in areas beyond any state’s national jurisdiction. However, these governance bodies vary greatly in terms of their mandate, which determines their geographic scope, their objective, the legally binding nature of decisions they adopt, and whether they regulate one or several activities. Their jurisdictions often overlap, but virtually no mechanisms exist to coordinate across geographic areas and sectors. Too often, this piecemeal governance approach leads to the degradation of the environment and its resources, and makes deploying management and conservation tools such as environmental impact assessments and marine protected areas (MPAs), including marine reserves, challenging both legally and logistically.

Continue reading Mapping Governance Gaps on the High Seas

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