Science

22 February, 2022

Source: Otago Daily Times

Author: Oscar Francis

A new mural being painted in Dunedin, New Zealand aims to highlight the environmental damage caused by deep-sea trawlers in New Zealand.

New Zealand’s deep-sea biodiversity hotspots are at risk from the destructive bottom trawling with New Zealand the only country left in the South Pacific to allow the practice.

The mural painted by Artist Cinzah Merkens is the latest in the DSCC’s Defend The Deep series with one in Auckland already completed and one in Ragalan and Wellington yet to come.

Read the article in full here

7 February, 2022

Source: Science Direct

Authors: Alan J. Jamieson, Todd Bond, Victor Vescovo

One of the concerns around deep sea mining is the time it is likely to take for previously undisturbed deep sea ecosystems to recover. A new study supports this theory, having found zero recovery of a large-scale anthropogenic sediment disturbance on the Pacific seafloor after 77 years at 6460 m depth.

Continue reading New study shows no recovery of deep seabed 77 years after anthropogenic disturbance

24 September, 2021

MEDIA RELEASE

For immediate release 24.9.21

Seamounts and other deep-sea ecosystems on the high seas get further protection from bottom trawling in the Northwest Atlantic 

The 43rd Annual Meeting of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) ended today, with new protections for deep-sea ecosystems on the high seas. NAFO agreed to close many more seamounts – underwater mountains recognized as biodiversity hotspots – to deep-sea trawling based on a proposal from the United States and Canada. Altogether all seamounts and other features less than 4000 meters depth are now fully protected from any future bottom fishing. The seamount closures cover an area of approximately 100,000 square kilometers.  

Continue reading New protections for fragile deep-sea ecosystems agreed by Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organisation

20 September, 2021

MEDIA RELEASE

Amsterdam: September 20, 2021

 The Annual Meeting of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) opens today. The Deep Sea Conservation is calling on the member countries of NAFO to agree to close seamounts and all areas identified by the Scientific Council of NAFO such as deepwater coral and sponge ecosystems to bottom trawling. 

Continue reading Deep-Sea Fishing Nations Must Make Progress on Protecting Sensitive Ecosystems at NAFO Annual Meeting

13 July, 2021

Source: Vox

Author: Dr Robin George Andrews 

Underwater mountains and volcanoes have been found to be more biodiverse than originally thought. Volcanologist, Dr Robin George Andrews, explores why these ecosystems are so important for life in the deep and the many, and growing, threats that they face.

Read the full article here

20 October, 2020

Source: Science News
Author: Maria Temming

Things are heating up at the seafloor.

Thermometers moored at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean recorded an average temperature increase of about 0.02 degrees Celsius over the last decade, researchers report in the Sept. 28 Geophysical Research Letters. That warming may be a consequence of human-driven climate change, which has boosted ocean temperatures near the surface (SN: 9/25/19), but it’s unclear since so little is known about the deepest, darkest parts of the ocean.

Continue reading Even the deepest, coldest parts of the ocean are getting warmer