Momentum for a Moratorium

Commercial deep-sea mining is a new threat that looms for our already imperiled ocean. If allowed to go ahead, mining would irreversibly destroy ancient deep-sea habitats, impact those who derive their livelihoods from the ocean (for example from fisheries), and risk disturbing the planet’s biggest carbon sink. The good news is that this is an industry that we can stop before it starts! We can demand of our elected leaders and their governments that they put science and precaution first when it comes to deciding whether or not to open the deep sea to an extractive industry that we don’t need and cannot afford. 

Many voices are speaking out against deep-sea mining. Some are calling for an outright ban, while others are calling for a moratorium unless and until a number of conditions around environmental harm, good governance and social license can be met.

Add your voice today to the growing movement calling for a moratorium on deep-sea mining.


Click below to see a full list of voices in each category.

In addition to calls for a ban or a moratorium on deep-sea mining, many voices are stating their concerns around deep-sea mining, clearly demonstrating that the world is not ready for this industry. 

  • The Norwegian Environment Agency
  • The Norwegian Ministry of Climate and Environment
  • The Institute for Marine Research in Bergen, Norway highlights the great lack of knowledge of the ecosystems in the areas where the government wants to open up for deep-sea mining
  • The World Bank
  • Tuvalu has withdrawn support for deep-sea mining in international waters
  • EU Advisory Councils (Mediterranean Sea, North Sea, North-western & Outermost regions) 
  • UK House of Commons Environment Audit Committee concluded that deep-sea mining would have “catastrophic impacts on the seafloor”; the International Seabed Authority benefiting from revenues from issuing mining licenses is “a clear conflict of interest” and “the case for deep-sea mining has not yet been made”