cobalt

7 July, 2017

Source: GreenBiz
Author: Erik Vance

Imagine sinking into the deepest parts of the Central Pacific Ocean, somewhere between Mexico and Hawaii. Watch as the water turns from clear to blue to dark blue to black. And then continue on for 15,000 feet to the seafloor — roughly the distance from the peak of California’s Mount Whitney to the bottom of nearby Death Valley. 

Continue reading In the depths of the oceans, business as usual takes a toll

16 April, 2015

Source: IASS Potsdam Blog

Author: Jeff Ardron

Some researchers think that the deep sea could become a treasure chest for humanity, full of gold, silver, cobalt, and other minerals – enough to feed our consumer societies for centuries and lift poor nations out of poverty.

Others are more doubtful.

Continue reading Gold at the Bottom of the Sea: Ours for the Taking? Myths and realities of deep-sea mining

20 December, 2013

Source: Huff Post Green

Author: Sophie Cocke

HONOLULU — Last summer, a team of Japanese scientists boarded the University of Hawaii’s Kaimikai O Kanaloa, a 223-foot, high-tech research ship docked in Honolulu Harbor, and headed out to sea. Their mission was to explore whether they will be able to tap into billions of dollars worth of coveted minerals that are believed to sit 5,000 meters beneath the sea in an area that runs from about 500 miles southeast of Hawaii toward Mexico.  Japan is one of more than a dozen countries angling to profit off the vast mineral deposits that span 6 million square kilometers — an area the size of the United States — in what’s known as the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone.

Continue reading Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone: The New Mineral Rush

17 December, 2013

Source: National Geographic

Author: Michael Lodge

The sea floor is as crucial to human flourishing as the earth’s surface, and as in need of careful stewardship. Just like the terrestrial environment, it is made up of mountain ranges, plateaus, volcanic peaks, canyons and vast plains. It contains most of the same minerals we find on land, often in enriched forms, as well as mineral formations that are unique to the deep ocean such as ferromanganese crusts and manganese nodules.

Continue reading New interest in seafloor mining revives calls for conservation

8 July, 2013

Source: Greenpeace International

A new report from Greenpeace International has found that the potential impact of deep sea mining is not properly understood. Mining could devastate biodiversity hotspots and endanger deep sea organisms as sediment waste and pollution from toxic heavy metals are discharged. This comes as only 3% of the world’s oceans and less than 1% of the high seas are protected, making them among the most environmentally vulnerable places on Earth.

Continue reading New report from Greenpeace International: Deep sea mining high risk